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Topic: Stars

NASA’s James Webb Telescope to peer into the Center of Milky Way Galaxy

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – The center of our galaxy is a crowded place: A black hole weighing 4 million times as much as our Sun is surrounded by millions of stars whipping around it at breakneck speeds. This extreme environment is bathed in intense ultraviolet light and X-ray radiation. Yet much of this activity is hidden from our view, obscured by vast swaths of interstellar dust.

NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope is designed to view the universe in infrared light, which is invisible to the human eye, but is very important for looking at astronomical objects hidden by dust.

The center of our Milky Way galaxy is hidden from the prying eyes of optical telescopes by clouds of obscuring dust and gas. But in this stunning vista, the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared cameras penetrate much of the dust, revealing the stars of the crowded galactic center region. The upcoming Webb telescope will offer a much-improved infrared view, teasing out fainter stars and sharper details. (NASA, JPL-Caltech, Susan Stolovy (SSC/Caltech) et al.)

The center of our Milky Way galaxy is hidden from the prying eyes of optical telescopes by clouds of obscuring dust and gas. But in this stunning vista, the Spitzer Space Telescope’s infrared cameras penetrate much of the dust, revealing the stars of the crowded galactic center region. The upcoming Webb telescope will offer a much-improved infrared view, teasing out fainter stars and sharper details. (NASA, JPL-Caltech, Susan Stolovy (SSC/Caltech) et al.)

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NASA Hubble Space Telescope data reveals more Gas flowing into the Milky Way, than out

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA says our Milky Way is a frugal galaxy. Supernovas and violent stellar winds blow gas out of the galactic disk, but that gas falls back onto the galaxy to form new generations of stars. In an ambitious effort to conduct a full accounting of this recycling process, astronomers were surprised to find a surplus of incoming gas.

“We expected to find the Milky Way’s books balanced, with an equilibrium of gas inflow and outflow, but 10 years of Hubble ultraviolet data has shown there is more coming in than going out,” said astronomer Andrew Fox of the Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland, lead author of the study to be published in The Astrophysical Journal.

This illustration envisions the Milky Way galaxy's gas recycling above and below its stellar disk. Hubble observes the invisible gas clouds rising and falling with its sensitive Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instrument. The spectroscopic signature of the light from background quasars shining through the clouds gives information about their motion. (NASA, ESA and D. Player (STScI))

This illustration envisions the Milky Way galaxy’s gas recycling above and below its stellar disk. Hubble observes the invisible gas clouds rising and falling with its sensitive Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instrument. The spectroscopic signature of the light from background quasars shining through the clouds gives information about their motion. (NASA, ESA and D. Player (STScI))

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NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope captures image of Cloud of Gas, Dust full of Bubbles

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – This infrared image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows a cloud of gas and dust full of bubbles, which are inflated by wind and radiation from young, massive stars. Each bubble is filled with hundreds to thousands of stars, which form from dense clouds of gas and dust.

The bubbles are estimated to be 10 to 30 light-years across, based on what astronomers know about them and other cosmic bubbles. However, determining the exact sizes of individual bubbles can be difficult, because their distance from Earth is challenging to measure and objects appear smaller the farther away they are.

This cloud of gas and dust in space is full of bubbles inflated by wind and radiation from massive young stars. Each bubble is about 10 to 30 light-years across and filled with hundreds to thousands of stars. The region lies in the Milky Way galaxy, in the constellation Aquila (aka the Eagle). (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This cloud of gas and dust in space is full of bubbles inflated by wind and radiation from massive young stars. Each bubble is about 10 to 30 light-years across and filled with hundreds to thousands of stars. The region lies in the Milky Way galaxy, in the constellation Aquila (aka the Eagle). (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Starshade technology to aid observations of far off Planets

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA says the feat of staying highly synchronized while airborne can be appreciated by anyone who’s ever seen aircraft engaged in formation flying. In work sponsored by NASA’s Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP), engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are taking formation flying to a new extreme.

Their work marks an important milestone within a larger program to test the feasibility of a technology called a starshade. Although starshades have never flown in space, they hold the potential to enable groundbreaking observations of planets beyond our solar system, including pictures of planets as small as Earth.

This artist's concept shows the geometry of a space telescope aligned with a starshade, a technology used to block starlight in order to reveal the presence of planets orbiting that star. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This artist’s concept shows the geometry of a space telescope aligned with a starshade, a technology used to block starlight in order to reveal the presence of planets orbiting that star. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope takes generational stellar photo

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – In this large celestial mosaic taken by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, there’s a lot to see, including multiple clusters of stars born from the same dense clumps of gas and dust. Some of these clusters are older than others and more evolved, making this a generational stellar portrait.

The grand green-and-orange delta filling most of the image is a faraway nebula, or a cloud of gas and dust in space. Though the cloud may appear to flow from the bright white spot at its tip, it is actually what remains of a much larger cloud that has been carved away by radiation from stars.

A mosaic by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of the Cepheus C and Cepheus B regions. This image combines data from Spitzer's IRAC and MIPS instruments. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

A mosaic by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope of the Cepheus C and Cepheus B regions. This image combines data from Spitzer’s IRAC and MIPS instruments. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory discovers stars kicked from their Galaxies

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – Evidence that pairs of stars have been kicked out of their host galaxies has been found by scientists. This discovery, made using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, is one of the clearest examples of stellar pairs being expelled from their galactic base.

Astronomers use the term “binary” system to refer to pairs of stars orbiting around each other. These stellar pairs can consist of combinations of stars like our Sun, or more exotic and denser varieties such as neutron stars or even black holes.

Binary stars ejected from Fornax cluster. (NASA/CXC/Nanjing University/X. Jin et al.)

Binary stars ejected from Fornax cluster. (NASA/CXC/Nanjing University/X. Jin et al.)

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NASA Scientist may have discovered way to detect Life Friendly Climates on Other Worlds

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA says scientists may have found a way to tell if alien worlds have a climate that is suitable for life by analyzing the light from these worlds for special signatures that are characteristic of a life-friendly environment.

This technique could reveal the inner edge of a star’s habitable zone, the region around a star where liquid water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet.

“Habitable planets by definition have water on their surfaces,” said Eric Wolf of the University of Colorado, Boulder. “However, water can come in the forms of ocean, ice, snow, vapor, or cloud. Each of these forms of water have very different effects on climate. ”

Artist rendering of a red dwarf or M star, with three exoplanets orbiting. About 75 percent of all stars in the sky are the cooler, smaller red dwarfs. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Artist rendering of a red dwarf or M star, with three exoplanets orbiting. About 75 percent of all stars in the sky are the cooler, smaller red dwarfs. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Nashville Predators manhandled by the Dallas Stars 5-1

 

Nashville PredatorsDallas, TX – The Nashville Predators were dominated by the Dallas Stars tonight, 5-1.  Every aspect of the Dallas attack was on point as the Stars evened the series 2-2.

The two teams head back to Nashville for a Saturday afternoon matinee at the Bridgestone Arena.  Puck drop is at 2:00pm.

The Predators never knew what hit them as the Stars scored three goals within the first ten minutes of the game.  Nashville didn’t help their cause any with four penalties in the first period, putting Dallas on the power play.  

Nashville Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne (35) defends against Dallas Stars right wing Alexander Radulov (47) and center Tyler Seguin (91) during the third period in game three of the first round of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs at American Airlines Center. (Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports)

Nashville Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne (35) defends against Dallas Stars right wing Alexander Radulov (47) and center Tyler Seguin (91) during the third period in game three of the first round of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs at American Airlines Center. (Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports)

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Nashville Predators regain home ice advantage with win over the Dallas Stars 3-2

 

Nashville PredatorsDallas, Tx — The Nashville Predators came through in the clutch tonight against a very aggressive Dallas Star hockey team to win, 3-2. 

Pekka Rinne was the difference maker for the Predators fighting off 40 of 42 shots by the Stars tonight who seemed relentless on goal.  Combined with a stifling defensive core for Nashville, they held off the Stars to regain home-ice advantage.

Rocco Grimaldi lit the lamp for Nashville at 3:29 of the second period, skating the puck along the boards, then firing the wrister past goalie Ben Bishop for the early 1-0 lead.

Apr 15, 2019; Dallas, TX, USA; Nashville Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne (35) and defenseman Roman Josi (59) defend against Dallas Stars center Mats Zuccarello (36) during the second period in game three of the first round of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs at American Airlines Center. Mandatory Credit: Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

Nashville Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne (35) and defenseman Roman Josi (59) defend against Dallas Stars center Mats Zuccarello (36) during the second period in game three of the first round of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs at American Airlines Center. (Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports)

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Nashville Predators defeat Dallas Stars 2-1 to even playoff series

 

Nashville PredatorsNashville, TN – The Nashville Predators evened their playoff series against the Dallas Stars tonight with an exciting, overtime win, 2-1.  Craig Smith drove the dagger in the heart of the Stars with his overtime winner.

Dallas won the series opener on Wednesday night, 3-2, to set the tone for a hard fought series between two teams that absolutely do not like each other.  

These are also the two teams that will be featured in the upcoming Winter Classic at the Cotton Bowl on New Years Eve.

Nashville Predators center Rocco Grimaldi (23) celebrates after the game winning goal by Nashville Predators right wing Craig Smith (not pictured) past Dallas Stars goaltender Ben Bishop (30) in overtime of game two of the first round of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Bridgestone Arena. (Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports)

Nashville Predators center Rocco Grimaldi (23) celebrates after the game winning goal by Nashville Predators right wing Craig Smith (not pictured) past Dallas Stars goaltender Ben Bishop (30) in overtime of game two of the first round of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Bridgestone Arena. (Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports)

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