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Topic: Tropical Storms

AAA reports National Gas Price Average rises One Cent

 

All Eyes on Tropical Storms

AAATampa, FL – At $2.18, the national gas price average increased by one cent on the week according to AAA. That is the same price as a month ago and 41 cents cheaper than a year ago.

The minimal change reflects the slow movement at pumps across the country on the week. The vast majority of states (30) saw pump prices fluctuate by a penny, if at all.

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NASA’s CYGNSS Microsatellites to give unprecedented measurements of Tropical Storms, Hurricanes

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA confirmed Friday morning that all eight spacecraft of its latest Earth science mission are in good shape. The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) will provide scientists with advanced technology to see inside tropical storms and hurricanes as never before.

CYGNSS launched into orbit at 5:37am PST (8:37am EST) Thursday aboard an Orbital ATK air-launched Pegasus XL launch vehicle. The rocket was dropped and launched from Orbital’s Stargazer L-1011 aircraft, which took off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of central Florida.

Artist's concept of one of the eight NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System satellites deployed in space above a hurricane. (NASA)

Artist’s concept of one of the eight NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System satellites deployed in space above a hurricane. (NASA)

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NASA’s RapidScat on International Space Station gathering data on Tropical Cyclones

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – The ISS-RapidScat instrument has been in orbit seven months, and forecasters are already finding this new eye-in-the-sky helpful as they keep watch on major storms around the globe.

RapidScat measures Earth’s ocean surface wind speed and direction over open waters. The instrument’s data on ocean winds provide essential measurements for researchers and scientists to use in weather predictions, including hurricane monitoring.

On Jan. 28, 2015 from 2:41 to 4:14 UTC, ISS-RapidScat saw the nor'easter's strongest sustained winds (red) between 56 and 67 mph (25 to 30 mps/90 to 108 kph) just off-shore from eastern Cape Cod. (NASA JPL/Doug Tyler)

On Jan. 28, 2015 from 2:41 to 4:14 UTC, ISS-RapidScat saw the nor’easter’s strongest sustained winds (red) between 56 and 67 mph (25 to 30 mps/90 to 108 kph) just off-shore from eastern Cape Cod. (NASA JPL/Doug Tyler)

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NASA increases it’s Hurricane Research efforts

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – During this year’s Atlantic hurricane season, NASA is redoubling its efforts to probe the inner workings of hurricanes and tropical storms with two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft flying over storms and two new space-based missions.

NASA’s airborne Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3 mission, will revisit the Atlantic Ocean for the fourth year in a row. HS3 is a collaborative effort that brings together several NASA centers with federal and university partners to investigate the processes that underlie hurricane formation and intensity change in the Atlantic Ocean basin.

Amanda, the first named storm of the 2014 hurricane season in the Americas, is seen off the west coast of Mexico in an image acquired on May 25 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite. At the time of the image, Amanda was a category 4 hurricane. Amanda's winds peaked at 155 miles (250 kilometers) per hour, making it the strongest May hurricane on record in the eastern Pacific. (NASA/MODIS)

Amanda, the first named storm of the 2014 hurricane season in the Americas, is seen off the west coast of Mexico in an image acquired on May 25 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite. At the time of the image, Amanda was a category 4 hurricane. Amanda’s winds peaked at 155 miles (250 kilometers) per hour, making it the strongest May hurricane on record in the eastern Pacific. (NASA/MODIS)

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