Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: air pollution

NASA’s studies to combat Moon Dust helps with fight against Air Pollution on Earth

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says moon dust isn’t like the stuff that collects on a bookshelf or on tables – it’s ubiquitous and abrasive, and it clings to everything. It’s so bad that it even broke the vacuum NASA designed to clean the moon dust off Apollo spacesuits.

With NASA’s return to the Moon and its orbit, it will need to manage the dust, which is dangerous for people too. The first step is knowing how much is around at any given time. Efforts to do just that are already paying off on Earth, in the fight against air pollution.

As the Apollo astronauts explored the lunar surface, they had to contend with lunar dust. (NASA)

As the Apollo astronauts explored the lunar surface, they had to contend with lunar dust. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA projects examine COVID-19 and it’s effects on the Environment

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – While scientists around the world are confined to their homes during the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic, Earth observing satellites continue to orbit and send back images that reveal connections between the pandemic and the environment. “Satellites collect data all the time and don’t require us to go out anywhere,” Hannah Kerner, an assistant research professor at the University of Maryland in College Park, said.

Kerner is among eight researchers recently awarded a rapid-turnaround project grant, which supports investigators as they explore how COVID-19 Coronavirus lockdown measures are impacting the environment and how the environment can affect how the virus is spread.

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the meandering Mississippi River, the largest river system in North America in this Landsat image. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the meandering Mississippi River, the largest river system in North America in this Landsat image. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Aura Satellite reveals Air Pollution over Northeast United States has fallen 30 Percent

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Over the past several weeks, NASA satellite measurements have revealed significant reductions in air pollution over the major metropolitan areas of the Northeast United States. Similar reductions have been observed in other regions of the world.

These recent improvements in air quality have come at a high cost, as communities grapple with widespread lockdowns and shelter-in-place orders as a result of the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19).

This image shows the average concentration of Air Pollution in March of 2015-19. (NASA)

This image shows the average concentration of Air Pollution in March of 2015-19. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


American Stroke Association reports Counties with Dirtier Air have more Stroke Deaths

 

American Stroke Association

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In a nationwide study, counties with dirtier air had higher rates of stroke deaths and shorter life expectancies, according to preliminary research to be presented in Honolulu at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2019, a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease.

Researchers examined the average yearly levels air pollution (PM2.5) that contains fine inhalable particles.

About half of U.S. counties have annual air pollution levels that exceed guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency. (American Heart Association)

About half of U.S. counties have annual air pollution levels that exceed guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says In-Womb Air Pollution Exposure associated with Higher Blood Pressure in Childhood

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during the third trimester of their mother’s pregnancy had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) is a form of air pollution produced by motor vehicles and the burning of oil, coal and biomass, and has been shown to enter the circulatory system and negatively affect human health.

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Air pollution linked to Cardiovascular Disease; Air Purifiers may lessen impact

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exposure to high levels of air pollution increased stress hormone levels and negative metabolic changes in otherwise healthy, young adults in a recent study conducted in China. Air purifiers appeared to lessen the negative effects, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers focused on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking – because many studies have suggested this type of major air pollutant might lead to cardiovascular and metabolic health consequences, according to Haidong Kan, M.D., Ph.D., study author and professor of environmental health sciences at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says “Bad” air may impact “Good” Cholesterol increasing Heart Disease Risk

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Traffic-related air pollution may increase cardiovascular disease risk by lowering levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), commonly known as “good” cholesterol, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Scientists have long known that air pollution increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and heart failure, but are uncertain how the two are connected.

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Air Pollution linked to Blood Vessel damage in Healthy Young Adults according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Fine particulate matter air pollution may be associated with blood vessel damage and inflammation among young, healthy adults, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

“These results substantially expand our understanding about how air pollution contributes to cardiovascular disease by showing that exposure is associated with a cascade of adverse effects,” said C. Arden Pope, Ph.D., study lead author and Mary Lou Fulton Professor of Economics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

Traffic on the highway. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Household Air Pollution linked to Higher Risk of Heart Attacks, Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Long-term exposure to household air pollution from lighting, cooking or heating with fuels, such as kerosene or diesel, may increase the risk of heart attacks and death, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Burning cleaner fuels, such as natural gas, was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular deaths.

According to the World Health Organization, one-half of the world’s population lives in poverty and burns fuels for lighting, cooking and heating purposes.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

NASA to use Spacecraft Orbiting Earth to track Air Pollution

 

Written by Steve Cole
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – For more than three decades NASA has focused its space-faring skills and science chops CSI-like on an elusive global killer. Later this month, that pursuit takes us to East Asia. In a few years, part way to the moon.

We are getting close.

Air pollution causes an estimated 152,000 deaths a year across the Americas and more than 2 million deaths in the Western Pacific, according to the United Nations. Some parts of the world have a detailed view of local air quality from ground sensor networks and forecast models that generate public alerts. But for much of the world this type of information and warning are not available.

Satellites have documented that human-produced and natural air pollution can travel a long way. This 2014 NASA satellite image shows a long river of dust from western Africa (bottom of image) push across the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

Satellites have documented that human-produced and natural air pollution can travel a long way. This 2014 NASA satellite image shows a long river of dust from western Africa (bottom of image) push across the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Now playing at the Movies