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Topic: Annie E. Casey Foundation

Tennessee Shows Reduction in the Number of Children Living in Concentrated Poverty

 

One of 29 States Nationwide to Show Progress in Child Poverty Rate According to New Data Snapshot from the Annie E. Casey Foundation

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – The percentage of Tennessee children living in areas of concentrated poverty fell 7% between 2013 and 2017, according to “Children Living in High Poverty, Low-Opportunity Neighborhoods,” a new KIDS COUNT® data snapshot released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Using the latest data available from the U.S. Census Bureau, the snapshot examines where concentrated poverty has worsened across the country despite a long period of national economic expansion.

Living in a neighborhood with a high level of concentrated poverty, in addition to putting children at risk from environmental exposure and reduced opportunities, can cause chronic stress and trauma.

In Tennessee 13% of kids are growing up in concentrated poverty. «Read the rest of this article»

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Clarksville Attorney Samuel Keen Selected for Groundbreaking Race Equity Training Program

 

Legal Aid Society attorneys will focus research on racial inequality amid school discipline

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the CumberlandsNashville, TNLegal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands, in conjunction with the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law, announced today that three of Legal Aid Society’s staff attorneys have been selected to participate in the 2016 Racial Justice Training Institute (RJTI).

RJTI is a national training program that increases the capacity of those advocating for low-income people, allowing them to deploy up-to-date racial justice advocacy skills that address the role racism plays in causing and perpetuating poverty.

Clarksville Attorney Samuel Keen

Clarksville Attorney Samuel Keen

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Kids Count State of the Child: Are Tennessee Children Prepared to Learn?

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – At the beginning of the school year, children wait for the school bus or in the drop-off lane for their first experience of school. Many of them arrive with the skills they need to learn. Many, however, arrive with gaps in the foundation for learning that must be filled so they can make the most of their experience.

Children do not enter school as blank slates, each equally impressionable to educators’ efforts. Children enter school with figurative backpacks. Some children come with an eagerness to learn, good health, emotional security and a sense of safety fostered by a supportive family and community. Others come without important tools for learning and already weighed down by the trauma of poverty, hunger, violence or abuse.

Kids Count State of the Child in Tennessee «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Improves in National KIDS COUNT Ranking on Child Well-Being

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – Tennessee is 36th this year in the annual KIDS COUNT National Data Book ranking on child well-being, better than its 39th ranking in 2013. The state is among the five states with the biggest improvements in overall rankings from 2013 to 2014.

The Data Book rates states on four domains: Economic Well-Being, Education, Health, and Family and Community. Each domain is comprised of four measures. When the most recently available data were compared to those from 2005, Tennessee improved on 10 of the 16 measures; worsened on five and remained the same on one, paralleling national changes.

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Tennessee Fourth Graders’ National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Reading Scores Improved over 10-Year Period

 

State of TennesseeNashville, TN – Fourth grade reading scores of Tennessee students improved more over the past 10 years than those of students in most other states, a new data snapshot on education finds.

The report, KIDS COUNT Data Snapshot: Early Reading Proficiency in the United States, compares 2003 and 2013 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) fourth grade reading scores.

It was issued by the Annie E. Casey Foundation KIDS COUNT Program. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Ranks 39th in National KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Report

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – Tennessee is 39th in the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2013 National KIDS COUNT Data Book ranking of child well-being released today.

Rankings on 16 indicators are clustered in four domains — Economic Well-Being, Education, Health, and Family and Community. Tennessee improved slightly on two domains, held steady on one, and dropped on another.

“Child well-being is a barometer of the current and future well-being of the state,” said Linda O’Neal, executive director of the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth, state affiliate of the KIDS COUNT program, “and while we are disappointed Tennessee’s 2013 composite ranking dropped from 36th in 2012 after three years of ‘best ever’ state rankings, we are pleased to see progress in several indicators. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth releases New Kids Count report

 

State of the Child Report Addresses Importance of Meeting the Needs of Abused and Neglected Children

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – Tennessee’s future depends on fostering the health and well-being of the next generation, including those children who are involved with the child welfare system. The latest edition of the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth’s KIDS COUNT: The State of the Child in Tennessee focuses on the impact of child abuse and neglect and the importance of a supportive infrastructure to help vulnerable children develop successfully.

Some stress is inevitable in life, but a chronic stressful condition such as neglect or abuse is called “toxic stress” and can disrupt developing brain architecture, leading to lifelong difficulties in learning, memory and self-regulation. Abuse, neglect and ‎separation from a parent present traumatic, toxic stress that can lead to a variety of ‎social, emotional and behavioral problems. «Read the rest of this article»

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Improved Living Environments Can Reduce Health Problems for Women and Children

 

Study finds moving to lower poverty neighborhoods decreases risk of obesity and diabetes

The National Science FoundationWashington, D.C. – Low-income women with children who moved from high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhoods experienced notable long-term improvements in aspects of their health; namely, reductions in diabetes and extreme obesity, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Chicago and partner institutions.

The New England Journal of Medicine published the study in a special article today, “Neighborhoods, Obesity and Diabetes – A Randomized Social Experiment.” Lead author for the collaboration was Jens Ludwig, the McCormick Foundation Professor of Social Service Administration, Law and Public Policy at University of Chicago

Research shows how basic social and economic science research can contribute to improving the health of women and children in major U.S. cities. (©2011 Jupiter Images Corporation)

Research shows how basic social and economic science research can contribute to improving the health of women and children in major U.S. cities. (©2011 Jupiter Images Corporation)

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Tennessee Celebrates Child Health Week

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Governor Bill Haslam has proclaimed October 3rd-9th, 2011 Child Health Week in Tennessee. State officials recently celebrated Tennessee’s highest-ever ranking for child well-being as part of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KidsCount Data Release.

On the heels of that announcement, Tennesseans are encouraged to put the health and well-being of children first during Child Health Week, and every week in the year ahead. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth Issues Kids Count State of the Child Report

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – Tennesseans remember recent challenges like the historic flooding and tornados as occasions when families and communities pulled together.  Now, many of the challenges we face impact Tennessee children. A report released today by the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth (TCCY), KIDS COUNT: The State of the Child in Tennessee 2010, looks at how the state’s children are faring and what Tennesseans can do together to help them overcome future challenges.

The book highlights programs with a proven record of success. Profiled in the report are home visitation, pre-K, coordinated school health and suicide and obesity prevention programs. These programs all improve outcomes for children, but home visitation services and pre-K are not available for all children and families who need them. There are also other successful programs that don’t have the resources statewide to meet all needs.  All Tennessee children deserve the opportunity to participate in quality, effective programs like these and others that improve their prospects for success. «Read the rest of this article»

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