Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Colin Campbell

74th Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor

 

Sailors man the rail of the USS Hopper (DDG 70) as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 2000. (SSG. Paul Holcomb/U.S. Air Force)

Clarksville, TN – When the Empire of Japan launched their sneak attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii it was 11:48am local time 74 years ago in Clarksville Tennessee and people were just getting getting out of church and looking forward to a Sunday lunch.

The time was 7:48am in Hawaii on Sunday December 7th 1941, and the sailors of the U.S. Fleet were conducting their Sunday morning worship services when Japanese aircraft attacked. The attack consisted of two waves of 354 aircraft which took off from six Japanese aircraft carriers, the Akagi, Kaga, S?ry?, Hiry?, Sh?kaku, and Zuikak.

The first warning of the air raid was sent out via radio to U.S Forces at 7:58am Hawaiian Time on Sunday December 7th 1941.

prradio «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Today Marks the 72nd Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor Hawaii

 
Sailors man the rail of the USS Hopper (DDG 70) as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 2000. (SSG. Paul Holcomb/U.S. Air Force)

Sailors man the rail of the USS Hopper (DDG 70) as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 2000. (SSG. Paul Holcomb/U.S. Air Force)

Clarksville, TN – It was 11:48am local time 72 years ago people in Clarksville Tennessee were just getting getting out of church, and were looking forward to Sunday lunch; when the Empire of Japan launched their sneak attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

The time was 7:48am in Hawaii on Sunday December 7th 1941, and the sailors of the U.S. Fleet were conducting their Sunday morning worship services when Japanese aircraft attacked. The attack consisted of two waves of 354 aircraft which took off from six Japanese aircraft carriers, the Akagi, Kaga, S?ry?, Hiry?, Sh?kaku, and Zuikak.

The first warning of the air raid was sent out via radio to U.S Forces at 7:58am Hawaiian Time on Sunday December 7th 1941.

prradio «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Remembering the Attack on Pearl Harbor 71 years later.

 
Sailors man the rail of the USS Hopper (DDG 70) as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 2000. (SSG. Paul Holcomb/U.S. Air Force)

Sailors man the rail of the USS Hopper (DDG 70) as it passes by the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 2000. (SSG. Paul Holcomb/U.S. Air Force)

It was 11:48am local time 71 years ago people in Clarksville Tennessee were just getting getting out of church, and were looking forward to Sunday lunch; when the Empire of Japan launched their sneak attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

The time was  7:48am in Hawaii on Sunday December 7th 1941, and the sailors of the U.S. Fleet were conducting their Sunday morning worship services when Japanese aircraft attacked. The attack consisted of two waves of 354 aircraft which took off from six Japanese aircraft carriers, the Akagi, Kaga, S?ry?, Hiry?, Sh?kaku, and Zuikak.

The first warning of the air raid was sent out via radio to U.S Forces at 7:58am Hawaiian Time on Sunday December 7th 1941.

prradio «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Today is the 68th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor

 

prradio

68 years ago today our nation suffered an attack that then President Franklin D. Roosevelt referred to as “A date which will live in infamy”. The attack propelled a reticent America into the Second World War, a conflict that started two years prior and would continue for another four years. The attack was aimed at preventing the United States from using its Naval forces to interfere with the Imperial ambitions of the Japanese Military.

A photograph taken from a Japanese aircraft of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The photo shows Battleship Row as a torpedo impacts the USS West Virginia

A photograph taken from a Japanese aircraft of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The photo shows Battleship Row as a torpedo impacts the USS West Virginia

The Japanese launched a total of 354 aircraft from six aircraft carriers, in two distinct waves. The first warning of the attack was sent out via radio  to U.S Forces at 7:58 AM Hawaiian Time on Sunday December 7th 1941 as the U.S. Fleet conducted their Sunday morning worship services

The attack sank four battleships and damaged another four. It also sank or damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, and one minelayer.  A total of 188 U.S. aircraft were destroyed, most of them on the ground. The human toll was staggering with 2,402 killed, and 1,282 wounded. A total of 16 Medals of Honor, 51 Navy Crosses, 53 Silver Crosses, four Navy and Marine Corps Medals, one Distinguished Flying Cross, four Distinguished Service Crosses, one Distinguished Service Medal, and three Bronze Stars were awarded to the soldiers, sailors, and airmen who responded to the attack. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | 1 Comment »
 

“Pants on Fire” Shares the Humorous Misadventures of Struggling Actor in L.A.

 

The Customs House Museum and Cultural CEnterThe Customs House Museum and Austin Peay State University present “Pants on Fire” with Producer/Director Colin Campbell as part of the Southern Arts Federation’s Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers in the museum’s theater on October third at 2 pm. Admission to the screening is free. Following a screening of his feature film, “Pants on Fire,” Campbell will engage the audience in a discussion about the film and his work as a filmmaker,

pants_on_fire_poster“Pants on Fire” tells the story of Brad Spoofer, a pathological liar on a quest for glory. Brad quit the Feed Barn Etc. back in Nebraska and moved to L.A. to become a movie star. His Hollywood career, however, has been a dismal failure. He’s the guy on the street corner dressed like a pirate and hawking mattresses. To save face, he’s been telling his naïve friends back home that he’s a movie star whose blockbusters are all about to be released in theaters. When his buddies decide to surprise him with a road trip to L.A., he has to scramble to prop up the illusion. Luckily, he scores a house-sitting gig for a wealthy couple in Bel Air and is able to keep the lie going, until he foolishly claims to be friends with the guy who played Pedro in “Napoleon Dynamite.” His awed buddies clamor to meet their idol. In the meantime, Brad has fallen for Lucy, a cute painter who decorates trash cans for a living and who mistakenly assumes Brad is a rich actor living in the hills. As his lies multiply and his checks bounce, he has to dodge the thug who took his headshots and never got paid, woo the girl, keep his job and, somehow, deliver Pedro. «Read the rest of this article»

 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Now playing at the Movies