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Topic: Geminids

NASA says the Geminids are the Best Meteor Shower of the Year

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – NASA says the Geminids are widely recognized as the best annual meteor shower a stargazer can see, occurring between December 4th to December 17th, 2020 with the best nights for viewing on December 13th and 14th.

The parent of the Geminids is 3200 Phaethon, which is arguably considered to be either an asteroid or an extinct comet. When the Earth passes through trails of dust, or meteoroids, left by 3200 Phaethon, that dust burns up in Earth’s atmosphere, creating the Geminid meteor shower.

An info graphic based on 2019’s meteor camera data for the Geminids. (NASA)

An info graphic based on 2019’s meteor camera data for the Geminids. (NASA)

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NASA research shows Perseid meteor shower to peak August 12th and 13th

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Meteor showers have always captured peoples interests. In astronomy, there’s nothing quite like a bright meteor streaking across the glittering canopy of a moonless night sky. The unexpected flash of light adds a dash of magic to an ordinary walk under the stars.

New research by NASA has just identified the most magical nights of all.

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NASA reports Comet Wirtanen could produce New Meteor Shower in December on the same nights as Geminid Meteor Shower

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – If you’re outdoors after sunset this week, be alert for meteors. Not only is the Geminid meteor shower active as Earth passes through a stream of debris from “rock comet” 3200 Phaethon, but also, say forecasters, a new meteor shower could make an appearance.

“The source of the new shower is Comet Wirtanen,” says Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office. “Dust from this comet hitting Earth’s atmosphere could produce as many as 30 meteors per hour.”

Comet Wirtanen. (Photo Max-Planck-Institut f|r Aeronomie, courtesy T. Credner, J. Jockers, T.Bonev)

Comet Wirtanen. (Photo Max-Planck-Institut f|r Aeronomie, courtesy T. Credner, J. Jockers, T.Bonev)

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NASA reports Geminid Meteor Shower to peak on December 13th and 14th

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Every year in mid-December, astronomers look up in the sky and witness a mystery. It announces itself with a flurry of shooting stars. For several nights in a row, dozens to hundreds of meteors per hour cut across the glistening constellations of winter, each one a little puzzle waiting to be solved.

“It’s the Geminid meteor shower–set to peak on December 13th and 14th,” says Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office. “Although the Geminids come every year, we still don’t fully understand them.”

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How to See the Best Meteor Showers of the Year: Tools, Tips and ‘Save the Dates’

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Whether you’re watching from a downtown area or the dark countryside, here are some tips to help you enjoy these celestial shows of shooting stars. Those streaks of light are really caused by tiny specks of comet-stuff hitting Earth’s atmosphere at very high speed and disintegrating in flashes of light.

First a word about the moon – it is not the meteor watcher’s friend. Light reflecting off a bright moon can be just as detrimental to good meteor viewing as those bright lights of the big city. There is nothing you can do except howl at the moon, so you’ll have to put up with it or wait until the next favorable shower.

A Geminid meteor. (Image credit: Jimmy Westlake)

A Geminid meteor. (Image credit: Jimmy Westlake)

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The 2011 Geminid Meteor Shower

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – The 2011 Geminid meteor shower peaks on the night of December 13th-14th, and despite the glare of a nearly-full Moon, it might be a good show.

“Observers with clear skies could see as many as 40 Geminids per hour,” predicts Bill Cooke of the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office. “Our all-sky network of meteor cameras has captured several early Geminid fireballs.  They were so bright, we could see them despite the moonlight.”

Skyview

Skyview

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