Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Gulf War

Fort Campbell to hold Wreaths Across America ceremony

 

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – Fort Campbell will host a Wreaths Across America ceremony, Saturday at 11:00am at the 101st Airborne Division Headquarters in partnership with the Sunrise Rotary Club of Clarksville.

Wreaths representing the five services and one for POW/MIA will be placed at the Division headquarters. Following the ceremony, volunteers will hang 101 wreaths at the T.C. Freeman Gate entrance. The wreaths will be placed in honor of fallen service members in WWII, Vietnam, Gulf War, Humanitarian/Peace Keeper Missions, and the Global War on Terrorism.

Wreaths Across America «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 

Wreaths Across America Volunteers hang 101 wreaths at Fort Campbell’s main gate

 

Written by Mari-Alice Jasper
Fort Campbell Public Affairs Office

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – U.S. Army Soldiers, veterans, community members and Fort Campbell leadership gathered Saturday, December 15th, 2018, at 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Headquarters to honor the fallen during a Wreaths Across America ceremony.

Fort Campbell hosted the event that was part of the Clarksville Sunrise Rotary club’s participation in the worldwide wreath-laying effort. This year, more than 2 million volunteers visited about 1,400 locations around the globe to place wreaths.

Wreaths Across America is a nonprofit organization founded to continue and expand the annual wreath-laying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.

Kim Fields, Wreaths Across America volunteer, holds her 3-year-old grandson, Austin, Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018, as he straightens the velvet red bow on a wreath honoring fallen service members during a Wreaths Across America ceremony on Fort Campbell, Kentucky. More than 50 volunteers worked together to hang 101 wreaths along the fence inside T.C. Freeman Gate, Fort Campbell’s main gate, to honor fallen service members. (Mari-Alice Jasper, Fort Campbell Courier)

Kim Fields, Wreaths Across America volunteer, holds her 3-year-old grandson, Austin, Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018, as he straightens the velvet red bow on a wreath honoring fallen service members during a Wreaths Across America ceremony on Fort Campbell, Kentucky. More than 50 volunteers worked together to hang 101 wreaths along the fence inside T.C. Freeman Gate, Fort Campbell’s main gate, to honor fallen service members. (Mari-Alice Jasper, Fort Campbell Courier)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

101st Airborne Division holds inactivation ceremony for 159th Combat Aviation Brigade at Fort Campbell

 

Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)

159th Combat Aviation BrigadeFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell, KY – Soldiers, families and friends of the 159th Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), gathered at the division parade field here, May 7th to conduct the final official ceremony in the brigade’s history.

After 18 years of service, the 159th CAB colors were cased at the ceremony by Col. Jimmy Blackmon, the final brigade commander of the 159th CAB “Thunder Brigade,” and retired Col. Bob Freeman, the honorary colonel of the brigade, signifying a conclusion to the legacy of this historic aviation unit.

Soldiers from the 159th Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), pay honors to the nation during the national anthem at the Thunder Brigade's inactivation ceremony at the division parade field on Fort Campbell, Ky., May 7, 2015. The 159th CAB cased its brigade colors for the final time during the ceremony, as well as all of its subordinate battalion colors and company guidons. (Staff Sgt. Joel Salgado, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Public Affairs)

Soldiers from the 159th Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), pay honors to the nation during the national anthem at the Thunder Brigade’s inactivation ceremony at the division parade field on Fort Campbell, Ky., May 7, 2015. The 159th CAB cased its brigade colors for the final time during the ceremony, as well as all of its subordinate battalion colors and company guidons. (Staff Sgt. Joel Salgado, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Public Affairs)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Montgomery County Veterans Service Organization to host Veterans Outreach at Civic Hall April 26th

 

Montgomery County Veterans Service OrganizationMontgomery County, TN – The Montgomery County Veterans Service Organization is hosting a Veterans Outreach for veterans and their dependents from 10:00am to 3:00pm, April 26th, at William O. Beach Civic Hall in Veterans Plaza, 350 Pageant Lane, Clarksville.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Events | No Comments
 

Fort Campbell Soldier carries pride as third generation Rakkasan

 

Written by U.S. Army Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton
3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division PAO

RakkasanFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Khowst Province, Afghanistan – Most families have running traditions that strengthen their bonds.

For the last three generations, the Fay household shares something very unique.

U.S. Army Spc. Robert Fay Jr., an infantryman assigned to Company D, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), is the third Soldier to be part of the Rakkasans in his family; following in his father’s and grandfather’s footsteps.

U.S. Army Spc. Robert Fay Jr., an infantryman assigned to Company D, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team "Rakkasans," 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), poses for a picture in front of a tactical vehicle at Camp Clark, Afghanistan, Feb. 20, 2013.(Army by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton, TF 3/101 Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Spc. Robert Fay Jr., an infantryman assigned to Company D, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), poses for a picture in front of a tactical vehicle at Camp Clark, Afghanistan, Feb. 20, 2013.(Army by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton, TF 3/101 Public Affairs)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Fort Campbell’s 187th Infantry Regiment “Rakkasans” celebrate 70 years of combat history

 

Written by Sgt. Alan Graziano
3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

RakkasanFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell, KY – The “Rakkasans” of the 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) have been trusted to carry out some of the nation’s most difficult missions for many years and through every war since World War II.

The regiment’s 70th anniversary was celebrated with an activation ceremony here February 20th, although the official anniversary was February 25th.

Irving Weinsoff, president of the 187th National Rakkasan Association, speaks about the history and the fallen Rakkasans of the 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) during an activation ceremony Feb. 20 at Fort Campbell, KY. (U.S. Army photo taken by Sgt. Alan Graziano, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault))

Irving Weinsoff, president of the 187th National Rakkasan Association, speaks about the history and the fallen Rakkasans of the 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) during an activation ceremony Feb. 20 at Fort Campbell, KY. (U.S. Army photo taken by Sgt. Alan Graziano, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault))

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Vietnam veteran still serving on active duty at Fort Campbell with the 101st Airborne Division, 1st Brigade Combat Team

 

Written by Spc. Kadina Baldwin
1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell, KY – At just over 6 feet tall, a soldier from a long line of war veterans walks with a unique swagger. He has the voice of a natural leader that only comes with time. His stern facial expression might throw some people off from his truly motivating and positive attitude, but it’s his teddy bear attraction that might draw a person in.

He’s been honorably in and out of the military for the past four decades, has served in three wars and is currently assigned to the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault).

Staff Sgt. Robert W. Middleswarth, 61, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), is scheduled to retire in December. Middleswarth, a Watsontown, PA, native, is one of only two active duty Vietnam veterans still serving on Fort Campbell, KY. (Photo by Spc. Kadina Baldwin)

Staff Sgt. Robert W. Middleswarth, 61, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), is scheduled to retire in December. Middleswarth, a Watsontown, PA, native, is one of only two active duty Vietnam veterans still serving on Fort Campbell, KY. (Photo by Spc. Kadina Baldwin)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Veterans Day

 

Lest we forget…

Yesterday was Veterans Day, a day set aside to honor the brave men and women who have taken up arms in defense of America and the freedom of her citizens in wars and conflicts.  It began in 1919 with President Woodrow Wilson’s words “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…” «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Commentary | No Comments
 

Torture Advocates have set the U.S. Military back for generations

 

Know what these photos are?

These are Iraqi troops surrendering by the thousand to U.S. forces during the first Gulf War in 1991.  These drafted Iraqi fighters chose to turn themselves over to Americans in droves because they knew they’d be treated better by U.S. troops than by their own government.  They had faith in us that we wouldn’t execute them, that we’d feed them and give them water, and that we’d provide them with shelter.  To them, facing capture was a much better option than either retreating back to the care of Saddam and his sadistic sons or of fighting to the death.

This worked out well, because it meant that we, as Americans, wouldn’t have to face a determined, cornered enemy that could’ve drawn out the war and inflicted unnecessary casualties on our side.  It was seen as a great victory.

(Warning: This article contains images which depict torture, and may be considered graphic)
«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Commentary | No Comments
 

Lugo on the military: No draft, no way!

 

My father is a Vietnam Veteran. He was an officer in ROTC in 1968 while he was in college and went to Vietnam as a Lieutenant the year I was born. My father felt an obligation to his country and a duty to serve when called. I was born in a snowstorm in rural Minnesota while my father was halfway around the world in the jungles of Vietnam. I am proud of my father and his service to my country.

When I was a teenager, going to private Catholic school, I was approached by military recruiters. I was encouraged to join the military and to enlist in the ROTC program, much like my father had been. For whatever reason, I declined. I was not yet a peace activist like I became after the first Gulf War, but something in my instincts told me that I could not serve in the military the way my father had served.

In 1990, while I was enrolled at the University of Minnesota, George Bush Sr. began beating the drums of war. I was enrolled in the selective service program at that time in order to get student loans to go to college. I remember clearly the night the bombs began to drop in Iraq for the first time. I was living in the student district of Minneapolis and there had been anti-war activity on campus leading up to the invasion. Students were busy organizing against the campus military center, sometimes called the stockade, holding demonstrations and putting anti-war material in front of the recruiting and training center. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Opinion | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Now playing at the Movies