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Topic: HDL Cholesterol

Gobbling your Food may harm your Waistline and Heart says American Heart Association

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – People who eat slowly are less likely to become obese or develop metabolic syndrome, a cluster of heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk factors, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Faster eating speed was associated with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. (American Heart Association)

Faster eating speed was associated with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says “Bad” air may impact “Good” Cholesterol increasing Heart Disease Risk

 

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Traffic-related air pollution may increase cardiovascular disease risk by lowering levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), commonly known as “good” cholesterol, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Scientists have long known that air pollution increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and heart failure, but are uncertain how the two are connected.

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

(At left), Air quality equipment monitors traffic-related air pollution on a New York City highway. (The MESA Air Study)

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American Heart Association says Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil may boost ‘good’ cholesterol

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil may enhance the cardioprotective benefits of high-density lipoproteins (HDL—the “good” cholesterol) compared to other diets, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

High levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL—the “bad cholesterol”) and triglycerides, a type of blood fat, are associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases. HDL cholesterol is associated with a lower risk because these lipoproteins help eliminate the excess cholesterol from the bloodstream.

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet - whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet – whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Older Adults with limited mobility may lessen Heart Problems with Activity

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Older adults with limited mobility may lower their risk of heart attack and coronary death for every minute of physical activity, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Reducing time spent being sedentary even by engaging in low-intensity activities could have important cardiovascular benefits for older adults with mobility limitations,” said Thomas W. Buford, Ph.D., senior author of the study and director of the Health Promotion Center of the University of Florida Institute on Aging in Gainesville, Florida.

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

Regular daily walking reduced the risk of stroke, regardless of the pace or distance. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Sesame and rice bran oil lowers blood pressure, improves cholesterol

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – People who cooked with a blend of sesame and rice bran oils saw a significant drop in blood pressure and improved cholesterol levels, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s High Blood Pressure Research 2012 Scientific Sessions.

The researchers found cooking with a combination of these oils in a variety of ways worked nearly as well as a commonly prescribed high blood pressure medication, and that the use of the oil blend with medication yielded even more impressive results. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Department of Health report “Cholesterol: Friend and Enemy of Healthy Aging”

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Whether you’re in your twenties or your sixties, you can reduce your chances of having a stroke or developing heart disease by learning about “bad” and “good” cholesterol. This knowledge isn’t just for “old people;” strokes and heart disease happen to people of all ages.

In Tennessee from 2007 to 2011, some 16,241 people died from stroke; of these, 1,307 or eight percent were under the age of 55. Similarly, from 2007 to 2011 there were 71,625 Tennesseans who died from heart disease; of these, 8,226 or 11.5 percent were under the age of 55. «Read the rest of this article»

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Reduce Diabetes Risk with good Nutrition and Exercise

 

November is American Diabetes Month

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Diabetes takes the lives of more Americans every year than breast cancer and AIDS combined, according to the American Diabetes Association. But with a healthy eating plan and regular exercise, people may reduce their risk for diabetes. As part of November’s observance of American Diabetes Month, the Tennessee Department of Health is reminding Tennesseans of free tools and tips available from Get Fit Tennessee to help reduce the risk for diabetes and its complications by improving nutrition and increasing physical activity.

“With more than an estimated 500,000 Tennesseans living with diabetes, it has become an alarming epidemic in our state,” said Health Commissioner Susan R. Cooper, MSN, RN. “The good news is that most cases of Type 2 diabetes are preventable with good nutrition and regular physical activity.” «Read the rest of this article»

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