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Topic: Heart Disease

American Heart Association says E-cigarettes take serious toll on Heart Health, Not Safer than Traditional Cigarettes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research that will be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019, November 16th-18th in Philadelphia,  E-cigarette use takes a serious toll on heart health — a big concern given the high prevalence of e-cigarettes and perception of e-cigarettes as a healthier alternative to traditional cigarettes.

E-cigarettes negatively impact the heart’s blood flow — possibly more chronically so than traditional cigarettes. (American Heart Association)

E-cigarettes negatively impact the heart’s blood flow — possibly more chronically so than traditional cigarettes. (American Heart Association)

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Nation’s Top Health Organizations Band Together to Urge Patients to Get Flu Vaccinations to Prevent Serious Health Risks

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time, the American Lung Association, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and the American Heart Association (AHA) have come together to raise an important alert about the dangers of influenza (flu) for people with chronic health conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and lung diseases such as asthma and COPD.

People are urged to get Flu Vaccination this year. (American Heart Association)

People are urged to get Flu Vaccination this year. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Maintaining Weight Loss beneficial for people with Type 2 Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association people with Type 2 diabetes who regained weight forfeited the initial benefits of reduced risk of heart disease or stroke compared to those who maintained their weight loss.

Regaining weight previously lost is common and can deteriorate the initial benefits of lowered heart disease or stroke risks.

Keeping off at least 75% of lost weight sustained or improved the initial benefits. (American Heart Association)

Keeping off at least 75% of lost weight sustained or improved the initial benefits. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says One daily Combo Pill helps Lower Heart Disease Risk in study of underserved patients

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the New England Journal of Medicine and funded by the American Heart Association, the leading voluntary health organization devoted to a world of longer, healthier lives, taking one daily pill that combined medications to treat high blood pressure and high cholesterol lowered heart disease risk among underserved patients better than taking several separate medications to treat these risk factors.

A polypill that delivers several medications to treat high blood pressure and high cholesterol in a single daily capsule appears to lower heart disease risk more than traditional care. (American Heart Association)

A polypill that delivers several medications to treat high blood pressure and high cholesterol in a single daily capsule appears to lower heart disease risk more than traditional care. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sleeping less than Six Hours and Heart Disease, Stroke – Deadly Combo

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association, middle-aged adults with high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke could be at high risk for cancer and early death when sleeping less than six hours per day.

Bar graph showing that for people who slept less than 6 hours, the risk of early death associated with hypertension or diabetes was two times higher, while the risk of early death associated with heart disease or stroke was three times higher. (Fernandez-Mendoza et al; Journal of the American Heart Association)

Bar graph showing that for people who slept less than 6 hours, the risk of early death associated with hypertension or diabetes was two times higher, while the risk of early death associated with heart disease or stroke was three times higher. (Fernandez-Mendoza et al; Journal of the American Heart Association)

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Arm Cuff Blood Pressure Measurements may fall short for predicting Heart Disease Risk in some people with resistant High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – A measurement of central blood pressure in people with difficult-to-treat high blood pressure could help reduce risk of heart disease better than traditional arm cuff readings for some patients, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.  

Central blood pressure, also called blood pressure amplification, is measured at the aorta, the artery closest to the heart.

Reducing heart disease risk in people with difficult-to-treat high blood pressure involves more than controlling blood pressure based on arm cuff measurements. (American Heart Association)

Reducing heart disease risk in people with difficult-to-treat high blood pressure involves more than controlling blood pressure based on arm cuff measurements. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says High Blood Pressure affects Young, Healthy Medical Students

 

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Almost two-thirds of medical students had above-normal blood pressure and were more than twice as likely to experience clinically high blood pressure compared to the general public, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.  

High blood pressure is typically linked with older age, being overweight, smoking and/or being in general poor health.

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

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Austin Peay State University alumni create Christopher C. Wyatt, Jonathan W. Wyatt Endowment to benefit APSU students

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – William (Bill) H. Wyatt (’70) and Victoria (Vicki) Brinkley Wyatt (’70) recently made a contribution to the Austin Peay State University (APSU) Foundation to establish the Christopher C. Wyatt and Jonathan W. Wyatt Endowment to benefit APSU students.

Bill and Vicki graduated from APSU in 1970. Their sons, Christopher and Jonathan, were both alumni of the University as well. The family has long supported Austin Peay State University.

Jonathan and Christopher Wyatt

Jonathan and Christopher Wyatt

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American Heart Association says Plaque in Arteries may not all be the same

 

American Heart AssociationBoston, MA – According to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Vascular Discovery Scientific Sessions 2019, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in new and emerging scientific research in arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, vascular biology, peripheral vascular disease, vascular surgery and functional genomics, a specific type of immune cell is more commonly found in arterial plaque from patients suffering from a recent stroke or mini-stroke.

Not all plaque is alike; researchers have found that a specific type of immune cell is more common in arterial plaque that is likely to cause a stroke or mini-stroke. (American Heart Association)

Not all plaque is alike; researchers have found that a specific type of immune cell is more common in arterial plaque that is likely to cause a stroke or mini-stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Says Heart Structure may change with Arsenic in Drinking Water

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart’s main pumping chamber in young adults, a structural change that increases the risk for future heart problems.

Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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