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Topic: Library of Congress

Curtis Johnson: News from the Tennessee Capitol, March 3rd, 2018

 

Written by Curtis Johnson
Tennessee State Representative

Tennessee State Representative - District 68

Nashville, TN – Ms. Theresa Carl, President of the Governor’s Books from Birth Foundation testified before the House Finance, Ways & Means Committee this week on the success of the Governor’s Books from Birth (GBBF) program. Their mission is to promote early childhood literacy in Tennessee’s birth to age five population.

In partnership with Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, the GBBF gives all preschoolers in Tennessee the opportunity to receive books in the mail at no cost to families.  The vision is a Tennessee where all preschool children have books in their homes, develop a love of reading and learning, and begin school prepared to succeed, from kindergarten throughout their educational journeys. 

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

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Sections: Politics | No Comments
 

A Look at the History of Independence Day

 

Library of CongressWashington, D.C. – The Second Continental Congress announced the colonies’ separation from Great Britain on July 4th, 1776, by unanimously adopting the Declaration of Independence.

The Constitution provides the legal and governmental framework for the United States, however, the Declaration, with its eloquent assertion “all Men are created equal,” is equally beloved by the American people.

Philadelphians marked the first anniversary of American independence with a spontaneous celebration, which is described in a letter by John Adams to Abigail Adams.

Declaration of Independence

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Sections: News | No Comments
 

The History of Independence Day

 

Library of CongressWashington, D.C. – The Second Continental Congress announced the colonies’ separation from Great Britain by unanimously adopting the Declaration of Independence, on July 4th, 1776.

The Constitution provides the legal and governmental framework for the United States, however, the Declaration, with its eloquent assertion “all Men are created equal,” is equally beloved by the American people.

Philadelphians marked the first anniversary of American independence with a spontaneous celebration, which is described in a letter by John Adams to Abigail Adams.

Declaration of Independence

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Austin Peay State University’s Dr. Sharon Mabry’s new album “Modern American Art Song” available now

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Throughout her career, Austin Peay State University professor of music, Dr. Sharon Mabry, has championed the music of contemporary composers. Her latest release, “Modern American Art Song,” continues that theme, focusing on five sets of songs by four contemporary American composers.

Mabry’s album features works by Kenton Coe, Brian Peterson, Persis Behar and George Mabry, with several of the works written specifically for Mabry and this release.

APSU's Dr. Sharon Mabry's new album "Modern American Art Song"

APSU’s Dr. Sharon Mabry’s new album “Modern American Art Song”

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Independence Day History

 

Library of CongressWashington, D.C. – The Second Continental Congress unanimously adopted the Declaration of Independence, announcing the colonies’ separation from Great Britain on July 4th, 1776.

The Constitution provides the legal and governmental framework for the United States, however, the Declaration, with its eloquent assertion “all Men are created equal,” is equally beloved by the American people.

Philadelphians marked the first anniversary of American independence with a spontaneous celebration, which is described in a letter by John Adams to Abigail Adams.

Declaration of Independence

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

The History of Independence Day

 

Library of CongressWashington, D.C. – On July 4th, 1776, the Second Continental Congress unanimously adopted the Declaration of Independence, announcing the colonies’ separation from Great Britain.

The Constitution provides the legal and governmental framework for the United States, however, the Declaration, with its eloquent assertion “all Men are created equal,” is equally beloved by the American people.

Philadelphians marked the first anniversary of American independence with a spontaneous celebration, which is described in a letter by John Adams to Abigail Adams.

Declaration of Independence

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

The Fantasy and Folklore of All Hallows Eve

 

Written by Jack Santino
Library of Congress

Library of CongressWashington, D.C. – Halloween had its beginnings in an ancient, pre-Christian Celtic festival of the dead. The Celtic peoples, who were once found all over Europe, divided the year by four major holidays. According to their calendar, the year began on a day corresponding to November 1st on our present calendar.

The date marked the beginning of winter. Since they were pastoral people, it was a time when cattle and sheep had to be moved to closer pastures and all livestock had to be secured for the winter months. Crops were harvested and stored. The date marked both an ending and a beginning in an eternal cycle.

The festival observed at this time was called Samhain (pronounced Sah-ween). It was the biggest and most significant holiday of the Celtic year. The Celts believed that at the time of Samhain, more so than any other time of the year, the ghosts of the dead were able to mingle with the living, because at Samhain the souls of those who had died during the year traveled into the otherworld. «Read the rest of this article»

 


Banned Books Week highlights the censored

 

Clarksville, TN – During the last week of September every year, hundreds of libraries and bookstores around the country draw attention to the problem of censorship by mounting displays of challenged books and hosting a variety of events. The 2011 celebration of Banned Books Week will be held from September 24 through October 1. Banned Books Week is the only national celebration of the freedom to read.

It was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. More than 11,000 books have been challenged since 1982.

There are hundreds of challenges to books in schools and libraries in the United States every year. According to the American Library Association (ALA), there were at least 348 in 2010; the ALA estimates that 70 to 80 percent are never reported.

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APSU professor’s novel to be on display at Library of Congress

 

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – If you’re in Washington, D.C., later this fall and you happen to stop by the Library of Congress to get a look at an early draft of the Declaration of Independence or an original Gutenberg Bible, be sure to keep your eyes out for a copy of “The Baker’s Boy,” a novel by Austin Peay State University professor Barry Kitterman.

The book will be on display inside the world’s largest library, with more than 22 million catalogued books, as part of the newly established Peace Corps Writers Collection.

Austin Peay State University professor Barry Kitterman

Austin Peay State University professor Barry Kitterman

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Sections: Education | No Comments
 

APSU Military History Program Continues to Get National Exposure

 

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – The Master of Arts in military history is a relatively young program at Austin Peay State University, receiving approval from the Tennessee Board of Regents only four years ago, but it is already garnering a national reputation as a respected degree program. That’s because the University’s M.A. in military history has received some rather prominent publicity in the last few years, including a recent article in the American Historical Association’s publication “Perspectives in History.”

The AHA, founded in 1884, is the largest historical society in the country. The article in its journal touts the APSU program’s “new military history” approach that stresses the relationship between war and society. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Education | No Comments
 



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