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Topic: NASA’s Johnson Space Center

NASA unveils New Spacesuits for Artemis Mission Astronauts

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In the photo below, Amy Ross, a spacesuit engineer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, left, and NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, second from left, watch as Kristine Davis, a spacesuit engineer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, wearing a ground prototype of NASA’s new Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit (xEMU), and Dustin Gohmert, Orion Crew Survival Systems Project Manager at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, wearing the Orion Crew Survival System suit, right, wave after being introduced by the administrator, Tuesday, October 15th, 2019 at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

NASA reveals New Spacesuits for Astronauts. The new Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit (xEMU) left for outside the spacecraft and the Orion Crew Survival System suit, right, to be worn while inside the spacecraft. (NASA, Joel Kowsky)

NASA reveals New Spacesuits for Astronauts. The new Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit (xEMU) left for outside the spacecraft and the Orion Crew Survival System suit, right, to be worn while inside the spacecraft. (NASA, Joel Kowsky)

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NASA engineers Next Generation Spacesuit for the Artemis Generation of Astronauts

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – At first glance, NASA’s new spacesuit that will be worn on Artemis missions might look like the suits that astronauts use for spacewalks outside the International Space Station today.

However, 21st century moonwalkers will be able to accomplish much more complex tasks than their predecessors, thanks to strides in technological advances that started even before the Apollo program.

NASA's Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit, or xEMU spacesuit design provides greater mobility for the Artemis astronauts who will be working on the Moon. (NASA)

NASA’s Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit, or xEMU spacesuit design provides greater mobility for the Artemis astronauts who will be working on the Moon. (NASA)

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NASA selects U.S. Companies, Partnerships to help develop Moon, Mars Tech

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – As NASA works to land humans on the Moon by 2024 with the Artemis program, commercial companies are developing new technologies, working toward space ventures of their own, and looking to NASA for assistance.

NASA has selected 13 U.S. companies for 19 partnerships to mature industry-developed space technologies and help maintain American leadership in space.

NASA centers will partner with the companies, which range from small businesses with fewer than a dozen employees to large aerospace organizations, to provide expertise, facilities, hardware and software at no cost.

Illustration of a human landing system and crew on the lunar surface with Earth near the horizon. (NASA)

Illustration of a human landing system and crew on the lunar surface with Earth near the horizon. (NASA)

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NASA celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – NASA lands “Men Land On The Moon”.

Words such as these were emblazoned in dozens of languages on the front page of newspapers around the world, echoing the first part of President John F. Kennedy’s bold challenge to the nation, made more than eight years earlier – to land a man on the Moon.

That part was successfully accomplished on July 20th, 1969. The second part of the challenge, the safe return to Earth, would have to wait four more days.

Eagle shortly after undocking. (NASA)

Eagle shortly after undocking. (NASA)

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NASA’s Mars 2020 rover mission will pave way for future Astronauts

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A historic moment, when a female astronaut first sets foot on the Moon in 2024 will represent a step toward another NASA first: eventually putting humans on Mars. NASA’s latest robotic mission to the Red Planet, Mars 2020, aims to help future astronauts brave that inhospitable landscape.

When a female astronaut first sets foot on the Moon in 2024, the historic moment will represent a step toward another NASA first: eventually putting humans on Mars. NASA’s latest robotic mission to the Red Planet, Mars 2020, aims to help future astronauts brave that inhospitable landscape.

This artist's concept depicts astronauts and human habitats on Mars. NASA's Mars 2020 rover will carry a number of technologies that could make Mars safer and easier to explore for humans. (NASA)

This artist’s concept depicts astronauts and human habitats on Mars. NASA’s Mars 2020 rover will carry a number of technologies that could make Mars safer and easier to explore for humans. (NASA)

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NASA picks Commercial Lander Providers for return to the Moon

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Three commercial Moon landing service providers have been picked by NASA to deliver science and technology payloads under Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) as part of the Artemis program.

Each commercial lander will carry NASA-provided payloads that will conduct science investigations and demonstrate advanced technologies on the lunar surface, paving the way for NASA astronauts to land on the lunar surface by 2024.

Commercial landers will carry NASA-provided science and technology payloads to the lunar surface, paving the way for NASA astronauts to land on the Moon by 2024. (NASA)

Commercial landers will carry NASA-provided science and technology payloads to the lunar surface, paving the way for NASA astronauts to land on the Moon by 2024. (NASA)

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NASA develops Flying Robots to help with work in Space

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMountain View, CA – Bees are known to be both busy and hard-working, and NASA’s new free-flying space robots, called Astrobee, will soon have the same reputation. Unlike bees that live on Earth, the robots will do their work flying alongside astronauts inside the International Space Station and will play a critical role in supporting innovative and sustainable exploration of the Moon, Mars and beyond.

Astrobee is a free-flying robot system that will provide a research platform for the orbiting laboratory. The system includes three robots—named Honey, Queen and Bumble— as well as a docking station for recharging.

Astrobee flight units and docking unit in granite table lab at the Atomated Science Research Facility N-269 NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field in Silicon Valley California. (NASA)

Astrobee flight units and docking unit in granite table lab at the Atomated Science Research Facility N-269 NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field in Silicon Valley California. (NASA)

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NASA’s Orion spacecraft completes Liftoff, Splashdown Safety Tests

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Engineers completed two key tests the week of March 18th to help ensure NASA’s Orion spacecraft is ready from liftoff to splashdown for missions to the Moon.

Teams successfully tested one of the motors on Orion’s Launch Abort System responsible for taking the crew to safety in an emergency during launch, and completed testing at sea for the qualification of the system used to upright Orion after it lands in the ocean.

NASA tested Orion’s crew module uprighting system off the Coast of North Carolina in March 2018. (NASA)

NASA tested Orion’s crew module uprighting system off the Coast of North Carolina in March 2018. (NASA)

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NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland mission still making discoveries

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Only seven months after NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) mission wrapped its last field campaign on the world’s largest island, an OMG crew is back in Greenland to collect more data.

With two or three field projects a year since 2016, no wonder OMG has made the most comprehensive measurements yet of how ocean water lapping at the undersides of Greenland’s melting glaciers affects them. All that data has answered a lot of existing questions – and it’s raised plenty of new ones.

Cracks in the front of a glacier as it reaches the ocean. (NASA/Adam Klein)

Cracks in the front of a glacier as it reaches the ocean. (NASA/Adam Klein)

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NASA reports SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft set for March 2nd Launch

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft—designed to fly astronauts to the International Space Station from U.S. soil—is ready for its debut flight on the company’s Falcon 9 rocket. It is a first-of-its-kind test mission of a commercially-built and operated American spacecraft and rocket designed for humans.

The Demo-1 uncrewed flight test, targeted to launch March 2nd, will demonstrate the company’s ability to safely launch crew to the space station and return them home.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft onboard is seen as it is rolled to the launch pad at Launch Complex 39A as preparations continue for the Demo-1 mission, Feb. 28, 2019 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Demo-1 mission will be the first launch of a commercially built and operated American spacecraft and space system designed for humans as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program. (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft onboard is seen as it is rolled to the launch pad at Launch Complex 39A as preparations continue for the Demo-1 mission, Feb. 28, 2019 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Demo-1 mission will be the first launch of a commercially built and operated American spacecraft and space system designed for humans as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

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