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Topic: Atlantic Ocean

NASA’s Geosynchronous Littoral Imaging and Monitoring Radiometer (GLIMR) instrument to observe Coastal Ecosystems

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA has selected a space-based instrument under its Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) portfolio that will make observations of coastal waters to help protect ecosystem sustainability, improve resource management, and enhance economic activity.

The selected Geosynchronous Littoral Imaging and Monitoring Radiometer (GLIMR) instrument, led by principal investigator Joseph Salisbury at the University of New Hampshire, Durham, will provide unique observations of ocean biology, chemistry, and ecology in the Gulf of Mexico, portions of the southeastern United States coastline, and the Amazon River plume – where the waters of the Amazon River enter the Atlantic Ocean.

NASA's Geosynchronous Littoral Imaging and Monitoring Radiometer (GLIMR) instrument will collect high-resolution observations of coastal ecosystems in such areas as the northern Gulf of Mexico, shown in this image with phytoplankton blooms stretching from the Texas and Louisiana coast (left) across the Mississippi River delta (center) toward Florida (far right). (NASA)

NASA’s Geosynchronous Littoral Imaging and Monitoring Radiometer (GLIMR) instrument will collect high-resolution observations of coastal ecosystems in such areas as the northern Gulf of Mexico, shown in this image with phytoplankton blooms stretching from the Texas and Louisiana coast (left) across the Mississippi River delta (center) toward Florida (far right). (NASA)

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NASA successfully tests Orion Spacecraft’s Launch Abort System

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – On Tuesday, July 2nd, 2019, NASA had a successful demonstration of how the Orion spacecraft’s launch abort system can outrun a speeding rocket and pull astronauts to safety during an emergency during launch. The test is another milestone in the agency’s preparation for Artemis missions to the Moon that will lead to astronaut missions to Mars.

During the approximately three-minute test, called Ascent Abort-2, a test version of the Orion crew module launched at 6:00am CDT from Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on a modified Peacekeeper missile procured through the U.S. Air Force and built by Northrop Grumman.

Ascent Abort-2 successfully launched at 6:00am CDT from Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. (NASA)

Ascent Abort-2 successfully launched at 6:00am CDT from Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. (NASA)

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Austin Peay State University’s first-ever space payload launches aboard NASA Rocket

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University’s first-ever space payload launched on Thursday, June 20th, 2019 around 4:30am CT.

Austin Peay State University physics professor Dr. Justin Oelgoetz and two APSU physics students – Zach Hill and Zach Givens – built the predesigned payload during Rocket Week at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

A NASA Terrier-Improved Orion suborbital sounding rocket launches, carrying Austin Peay State University’s first space-bound payload. (NASA)

A NASA Terrier-Improved Orion suborbital sounding rocket launches, carrying Austin Peay State University’s first space-bound payload. (NASA)

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Austin Peay State University to send payload to space for first time in school history

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University has a payload bound for space. This is a first in APSU’s 92-year history.

Austin Peay State University physics professor Dr. Justin Oelgoetz made the announcement on Facebook Tuesday: “APSU’s first payload bound for space just passed inspection and has been integrated into the rocket’s payload stack.”

Austin Peay State University students Zach Hill, left, and Zach Givens show off some of their work during Rocket Week at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. (APSU)

Austin Peay State University students Zach Hill, left, and Zach Givens show off some of their work during Rocket Week at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. (APSU)

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NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations to prepare Astronauts for Space Missions

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Beginning June 10th, NASA will future deep space missions by joining an international crew on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean this summer during the 10-day NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 23 expedition.

NEEMO 23 will focus on both exploration spacewalks and objectives related to space missions such as the International Space Station and future deep space missions to the Moon and Mars. As an analogue for future planetary science concepts and strategies, marine science also will be performed under the guidance of Florida International University’s marine science department.

The pictured NEEMO 22 diver is collecting a scientific sample for coral research using proxy tools, techniques, technologies, and training envisioned for future NASA planetary science exploration missions. (NASA)

The pictured NEEMO 22 diver is collecting a scientific sample for coral research using proxy tools, techniques, technologies, and training envisioned for future NASA planetary science exploration missions. (NASA)

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NASA excited about Apophis Asteroid passing by Earth in 2029

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA says that a speck of light will streak across the sky, getting brighter and faster on April 13th, 2029. At one point it will travel more than the width of the full Moon within a minute and it will get as bright as the stars in the Little Dipper.

But it won’t be a satellite or an airplane – it will be a 1,100-foot-wide (340-meter-wide) near-Earth asteroid called 99942 Apophis that will cruise harmlessly by Earth, about 19,000 miles (31,000 kilometers) above the surface. That’s within the distance that some of our spacecraft that orbit Earth.

The international asteroid research community couldn’t be more excited.

This illustration shows the distance between the Apophis asteroid and Earth at the time of the asteroid's closest approach. The blue dots are the many man-made satellites that orbit our planet, and the pink represents the International Space Station. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This illustration shows the distance between the Apophis asteroid and Earth at the time of the asteroid’s closest approach. The blue dots are the many man-made satellites that orbit our planet, and the pink represents the International Space Station. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA says Greenland’s fastest moving, fastest thinning Glacier is slowing, thickening

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA’s Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA research shows that Jakobshavn Glacier, which has been Greenland’s fastest-flowing and fastest-thinning glacier for the last 20 years, has made an unexpected about-face.

Jakobshavn is now flowing more slowly, thickening, and advancing toward the ocean instead of retreating farther inland. The glacier is still adding to global sea level rise – it continues to lose more ice to the ocean than it gains from snow accumulation – but at a slower rate.

The calving front of Jakobshavn Glacier, center. (NASA/OIB/John Sonntag)

The calving front of Jakobshavn Glacier, center. (NASA/OIB/John Sonntag)

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NASA’s Orion spacecraft completes Liftoff, Splashdown Safety Tests

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Engineers completed two key tests the week of March 18th to help ensure NASA’s Orion spacecraft is ready from liftoff to splashdown for missions to the Moon.

Teams successfully tested one of the motors on Orion’s Launch Abort System responsible for taking the crew to safety in an emergency during launch, and completed testing at sea for the qualification of the system used to upright Orion after it lands in the ocean.

NASA tested Orion’s crew module uprighting system off the Coast of North Carolina in March 2018. (NASA)

NASA tested Orion’s crew module uprighting system off the Coast of North Carolina in March 2018. (NASA)

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A Friendship born in War, Carentan students visit Fort Campbell

 

Written by Sgt. 1st Class Katrina Craig
101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – The 101st Airborne Division, as we know it today, stems from World War II. Nearly eight decades ago, Nazi forces occupied Carentan, a small city in northern France. The 101st Airborne Division had one mission on June 6th, 1944 – liberate Carentan.

The Battle of Normandy was a week of brutal fighting, during which many U.S. Soldiers were either killed or missing in action. Eventually, 101st troops defeated the Nazis, driving them out of the city. The newly liberated citizens of Carentan developed a swell of thankfulness so deep it formed a bond between the citizens of two cities, a world apart.

French students from Lycee Sivard de Beaulieu High School proudly stand in front of a street sign named after their city, Carentan, March 12, at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. The students visited Fort Campbell and 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Soldiers as a part of the “Memory and Gratitude Tour,” which honors the day the 101st Airborne Division liberated Carentan from Nazi-German forces, in 1944. (Sgt. 1st Class Katrina Craig)

French students from Lycee Sivard de Beaulieu High School proudly stand in front of a street sign named after their city, Carentan, March 12, at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. The students visited Fort Campbell and 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Soldiers as a part of the “Memory and Gratitude Tour,” which honors the day the 101st Airborne Division liberated Carentan from Nazi-German forces, in 1944. (Sgt. 1st Class Katrina Craig)

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NASA reports SpaceX Crew Dragon Splashes down, Marks Success of First Commercial Crew Flight Test

 

NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA passed a major milestone Friday in its goal to restore America’s human spaceflight capability when SpaceX’s Crew Dragon returned to Earth after a five-day mission docked to the International Space Station.

About 6 hours after departing the space station, Crew Dragon splashed down at 7:45am CST approximately 230 miles off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida. SpaceX retrieved the spacecraft from the Atlantic Ocean and is transporting it back to port on the company’s recovery ship.

Completing an end-to-end uncrewed flight test, Demo-1, SpaceX’s Crew Dragon departed the International Space Station at 1:32am CST Friday, March 8, 2019, and splashed down at 8:45 a.m. in the Atlantic Ocean about 200 nautical miles off the Florida coast. (NASA Television)

Completing an end-to-end uncrewed flight test, Demo-1, SpaceX’s Crew Dragon departed the International Space Station at 1:32am CST Friday, March 8, 2019, and splashed down at 8:45 a.m. in the Atlantic Ocean about 200 nautical miles off the Florida coast. (NASA Television)

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