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Senator Lamar Alexander: “Will There Be Enough COVID-19 Tests So We Can Watch Some Football This Fall, Or Basketball This Winter?”

 

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – At a Senate hearing this past week on COVID-19 Coronavirus, U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) asked National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis Collins whether “In the midst of all this depressing news about the virus, will there be enough tests so we can watch some football this fall, or basketball this winter?”

Alexander said the answer may depend upon Dr. Collins’ project to find new ways to produce tens of millions of quick, reliable diagnostic tests. 

Dr. Collins is heading an effort, nicknamed the “shark tank,” to accelerate development of new tests to determine whether an individual has COVID-19 Coronavirus.

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

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American Heart Association reports Heart Failure Deaths are highest in Poorest U.S. Counties

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People living in counties with high rates of poverty are more likely to die from heart failure compared to people living in more affluent areas, according to new research published in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association.

Death rates from heart failure are higher in counties with higher levels of poverty. (American Heart Association)

Death rates from heart failure are higher in counties with higher levels of poverty. (American Heart Association)

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NASA confirms Ice on Moon’s Poles

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – In the darkest and coldest parts of its polar regions, a team of NASA scientists has directly observed definitive evidence of water ice on the Moon’s surface. These ice deposits are patchily distributed and could possibly be ancient. At the southern pole, most of the ice is concentrated at lunar craters, while the northern pole’s ice is more widely, but sparsely spread.

A team of scientists, led by Shuai Li of the University of Hawaii and Brown University and including Richard Elphic from NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, used data from NASA’s Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) instrument to identify three specific signatures that definitively prove there is water ice at the surface of the Moon.

The image shows the distribution of surface ice at the Moon's south pole (left) and north pole (right), detected by NASA's Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument. Blue represents the ice locations, plotted over an image of the lunar surface, where the gray scale corresponds to surface temperature (darker representing colder areas and lighter shades indicating warmer zones). (NASA)

The image shows the distribution of surface ice at the Moon’s south pole (left) and north pole (right), detected by NASA’s Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument. Blue represents the ice locations, plotted over an image of the lunar surface, where the gray scale corresponds to surface temperature (darker representing colder areas and lighter shades indicating warmer zones). (NASA)

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American Heart Association says Tai Chi holds promise as Cardiac Rehab Exercise

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation, according to preliminary research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

After a heart attack, more than 60 percent of patients decline participation in cardiac rehabilitation.

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

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NASA’s Dawn Mission finds Evidence for Organic Material on Dwarf Planet Ceres

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Dawn mission has found evidence for organic material on Ceres, a dwarf planet and the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

Scientists using the spacecraft’s visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) detected the material in and around a northern-hemisphere crater called Ernutet. Organic molecules are interesting to scientists because they are necessary, though not sufficient, components of life on Earth.

This enhanced color composite image, made with data from the framing camera aboard NASA's Dawn spacecraft, shows the area around Ernutet Crater. The bright red portions appear redder with respect to the rest of Ceres. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

This enhanced color composite image, made with data from the framing camera aboard NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, shows the area around Ernutet Crater. The bright red portions appear redder with respect to the rest of Ceres. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

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American Heart Association says Yo-Yo Dieting Dangerous even if you’re not Overweight

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Repeatedly losing and regaining weight, known as weight cycling or yo-yo dieting, may increase the risk of death from heart disease among postmenopausal women who were of normal weight at the start of the study, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Normal weight postmenopausal women at the start of the study who lost and regained weight had: 3 and ½ times higher risk for sudden cardiac death and nearly 66% increased risk for coronary heart disease death. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter discovers Glass in Impact Craters on Mars

 

Written by Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has detected deposits of glass within impact craters on Mars. Though formed in the searing heat of a violent impact, such deposits might provide a delicate window into the possibility of past life on the Red Planet.

During the past few years, research has shown evidence about past life has been preserved in impact glass here on Earth. A 2014 study led by scientist Peter Schultz of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, found organic molecules and plant matter entombed in glass formed by an impact that occurred millions of years ago in Argentina.

Researchers have found deposits of impact glass preserved in Martian craters, including Alga Crater, shown here. The detection is based on data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/JHUAPL/Univ. of Arizona)

Researchers have found deposits of impact glass preserved in Martian craters, including Alga Crater, shown here. The detection is based on data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/JHUAPL/Univ. of Arizona)

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APSU Governors Basketball loses to Stephen F. Austin Lumberjacks in Continental Tire Las Vegas Invitational

 

Austin Peay Sports Information

Austin Peay State University Governors - APSULas Vegas, NV – Stephen F. Austin advanced to the third round of last March’s NCAA basketball tournament. Austin Peay State University found out why Friday.

The Lumberjacks, who return most of their players from a 32-winn 2013-14 team, shot 63 percent from the floor while limiting the Governors to only 42 percent shooting as APSU fell 83-62 in the upper division title game of the Continental Tire Las Vegas Invitational.

Khalil Davis named to all-tourney team after 25-point effort (Brad Kirtley/APSU Sports Information)

Khalil Davis named to all-tourney team after 25-point effort (Brad Kirtley/APSU Sports Information)

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NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover confirms first Mineral Mapped from Space

 

Written by Preston Dyches and Guy Webster
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Reddish rock powder from the first hole drilled into a Martian mountain by NASA’s Curiosity rover has yielded the mission’s first confirmation of a mineral mapped from orbit.

“This connects us with the mineral identifications from orbit, which can now help guide our investigations as we climb the slope and test hypotheses derived from the orbital mapping,” said Curiosity Project Scientist John Grotzinger, of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

This image shows the first holes drilled by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity at Mount Sharp. The loose material near the drill holes is drill tailings and an accumulation of dust that slid down the rock during drilling. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

This image shows the first holes drilled by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity at Mount Sharp. The loose material near the drill holes is drill tailings and an accumulation of dust that slid down the rock during drilling. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

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Rossview High School’s Janie White signs with Ivy League’s Brown University

 

Rossview High School HawksClarksville, TN – Just a day after winning their first District 10-AAA tournament title, Rossview High School standout Janie White made her future plans official, February 18th, by signing with Ivy League member Brown University to play basketball for the Bears.

White, a 6-foot-3 center/forward, chose Brown over more than 30 schools that had shown interest – including her other final choices Penn, Tennessee-Chattanooga, Middle Tennessee and Pepperdine.

Rossview’s Janie White signs with Brown University. (Michael Rios-Clarksville Sports Network)

Rossview’s Janie White signs with Brown University. (Michael Rios-Clarksville Sports Network)

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