Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Geological Society of America

APSU Students conduct research on different GPS devices accuracy for field purposes

 

Austin Peay State University

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – Late last year, a group of Austin Peay State University geosciences students hiked through the woods in rural North Carolina, conducting field research.

They were looking for unusual rock outcroppings, and after each discovery, the students painstakingly scribbled down the longitudinal and latitudinal coordinates of the rocks into their notebooks.

That is, except for APSU student Maurice Testa. He simply pulled out his smart phone and quickly went to work.

APSU students James Martin, Maurice Testa and Eric Whitaker stand before their poster at the Geological Society of America meeting.

APSU students James Martin, Maurice Testa and Eric Whitaker stand before their poster at the Geological Society of America meeting.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Education | No Comments
 

APSU Employees share recent plaudits

 

Austin Peay State University

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – Faculty and staff members at Austin Peay State University recently announced publications or conferences attended as part of their professional and scholarly activities.

Dr. Gregg Steinberg, professor of health and human performance and a sports psychologist, is a regular contributor every Tuesday to the show “Talk of the TOUR” on the PGA Tour radio on XM/Sirius. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Education | No Comments
 

NASA’s Dawn Science Team Presents Early Science Results

 

Written by Priscilla Vega
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Scientists with NASA’s Dawn mission are sharing with other scientists and the public their early information about the southern hemisphere of the giant asteroid Vesta. The findings were presented today at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Minneapolis, MN.

Dawn, which has been orbiting Vesta since mid-July, has found that the asteroid’s southern hemisphere boasts one of the largest mountains in the solar system. Other findings show that Vesta’s surface, viewed by Dawn at different wavelengths, has striking diversity in its composition, particularly around craters.

This full view of the giant asteroid Vesta was taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, as part of a rotation characterization sequence on July 24th, 2011, at a distance of 3,200 miles (5,200 kilometers). A rotation characterization sequence helps the scientists and engineers by giving an initial overview of the character of the surface as Vesta rotated underneath the spacecraft. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

This full view of the giant asteroid Vesta was taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, as part of a rotation characterization sequence on July 24th, 2011, at a distance of 3,200 miles (5,200 kilometers). A rotation characterization sequence helps the scientists and engineers by giving an initial overview of the character of the surface as Vesta rotated underneath the spacecraft. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


New View of Vesta Mountain From NASA’s Dawn Mission

 

Written by Priscilla Vega
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new image from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft shows a mountain three times as high as Mt. Everest, amidst the topography in the south polar region of the giant asteroid Vesta.

The peak of Vesta’s south pole mountain, seen in the center of the image, rises about 13 miles (22 kilometers) above the average height of the surrounding terrain. Another impressive structure is a large scarp, a cliff with a steep slope, on the right side of this image. The scarp bounds part of the south polar depression, and the Dawn team’s scientists believe features around its base are probably the result of landslides.

The image below was created from a shape model of Vesta, and shows an oblique perspective view of the topography of the south polar region. The image resolution is about 300 meters per pixel, and the vertical scale is 1.5 times that of the horizontal scale.

This image of the asteroid Vesta, calculated from a shape model, shows a tilted view of the topography of the south polar region. The image has a resolution of about 1,000 feet (300 meters) per pixel, and the vertical scale is 1.5 times that of the horizontal scale. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI)

This image of the asteroid Vesta, calculated from a shape model, shows a tilted view of the topography of the south polar region. The image has a resolution of about 1,000 feet (300 meters) per pixel, and the vertical scale is 1.5 times that of the horizontal scale. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Several APSU faculty, staff spotlighted for Achievements

 

Austin Peay State UniversityClarksville, TN – Several faculty and staff members at Austin Peay State University were noted recently for various accomplishments.

Dr. Phyllis A. Camilleri and Dr. Jack Deibert, both professors of geology and geography, and Sue Breeden, analyst in the GIS Center, will present their research, titled “Preliminary Geologic Mapping and Quaternary Faulting of the Western Margin of the Grant Range, East-Central Nevada,” at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America, October 9th-12th in Minneapolis, MN. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Education | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls