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Topic: North America

President Donald Trump, Michigan Autoworkers celebrate the end of NAFTA

 

The White HouseWashington, D.C. – President Donald Trump flew to Michigan Thursday, January 20th, 2020, where he joined workers to celebrate the signing of his new U.S.–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA) and the end of NAFTA.

Dana Incorporated, where the President spoke, perfectly captures America’s blue-collar spirit. Based near Detroit, the company employs more than 1,500 workers that help assemble some of the toughest vehicles in the world. Dana Inc., for example, helped invent the iconic U.S. Army Jeep in 1941.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews.

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Dodging the Roadkill: Passing Of A Rock and Roll Biker

 

Dodging the Roadkill - A Biker's JourneyClarksville, TN – One of the greatest rock-n-roll musicians in the history of music, died last Tuesday.  The news was released this past Saturday.  Neil Peart, lyricist and drummer for the band Rush, lost his battle with brain cancer.

Diagnosed in 2016, the intensely private musician kept his illness to his immediate family and friends.  Until the news this past Saturday of his death, I had NO idea he was fighting this battle.

Neil Peart was also a biker.

If you’re a fan of Rush, then you probably know how much Peart loved his motorcycles, and loved the freedom and anonymity that they provide.  It was out of tragedy that Peart turned to his bike and continued his passion for them until his death.

Neil Peart

Neil Peart

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New Austin Peay State University journal highlights creative side of studying abroad

 

Austin Peay State University (APSU)

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Smartphone photos are fine for most tourists, but when Austin Peay State University (APSU) student Amir Elraheb first experienced the splendor of Madrid, Spain, he pulled out his watercolors to truly capture the city.

“It’s sort of like a photograph, but when you are painting you have to pay attention to the details of whatever you’re looking at so much harder, so scenes are engrained in my head,” Elraheb, an Austin Peay State University foreign language major, said.

Austin Peay State University professors Dr. Sergi Markov and Dr. Osvaldo Di Paolo Harrison review the first issue of "Explore Your World."

Austin Peay State University professors Dr. Sergi Markov and Dr. Osvaldo Di Paolo Harrison review the first issue of “Explore Your World.”

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Sections: Education | No Comments
 


Shiloh Industries in Clarksville Ready for New Product Production

 

Clarksville-Montgomery County Industrial Development BoardClarksville, TN – Shiloh Industries is gearing up for new product production in Clarksville-Montgomery County’s Corporate Business Park with the first new die cast machine expected to be installed this week.

The company’s soon-to-be local plant manager, Gerald Craycraft, met with the Industrial Development Board this week to announce new improvements and new product lines to Shiloh’s original plans since purchasing Contech in August 2013.

IDB Chairman Billy Atkins and Shiloh Plant Manager Gerald Craycraft hold a magnesium dashboard panel manufactured at the Shiloh plant in Ireland.

IDB Chairman Billy Atkins and Shiloh Plant Manager Gerald Craycraft hold a magnesium dashboard panel manufactured at the Shiloh plant in Ireland.

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NASA announces NOAA’s GOES-16 Satellite takes First Photos of Earth

 

Written by John Leslie
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationSilver Spring, MD – GOES-16, the first spacecraft in NOAA’s next-generation of geostationary satellites, has sent the first high-resolution images from its Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) instrument. Included among them are a composite color full-disk visible image of the Western Hemisphere captured on January 15th, 2017.

Created using several of the ABI’s 16 spectral channels, the full-disk image offers an example the satellite’s advanced technology.

This composite color full-disk visible image of the Western Hemisphere was captured from NOAA GOES-16 satellite at 1:07 pm EST on Jan. 15, 2017 and created using several of the 16 spectral channels available on the satellite's sophisticated Advanced Baseline Imager. The image, taken from 22,300 miles above the surface, shows North and South America and the surrounding oceans. (NOAA)

This composite color full-disk visible image of the Western Hemisphere was captured from NOAA GOES-16 satellite at 1:07 pm EST on Jan. 15, 2017 and created using several of the 16 spectral channels available on the satellite’s sophisticated Advanced Baseline Imager. The image, taken from 22,300 miles above the surface, shows North and South America and the surrounding oceans. (NOAA)

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s AIRS Instrument Tracks Series of Storms Battering California

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A series of atmospheric rivers that brought drought-relieving rains, heavy snowfall and flooding to California this week is highlighted in a new movie created with satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite.

The images of atmospheric water vapor were collected by AIRS between January 7th and 11th. They show the amount of moisture present in the atmosphere and its movement across the Pacific Ocean to the United States, where much of it fell as rain or snow.

A series of atmospheric rivers that brought drought-relieving rains, heavy snowfall and flooding to California this week is highlighted in a new movie created with satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

A series of atmospheric rivers that brought drought-relieving rains, heavy snowfall and flooding to California this week is highlighted in a new movie created with satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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APSU College of Education prepares local teachers for 2017 Solar Eclipse

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – On June 21st, Austin Peay State Univeristy (APSU) hosted an educational summit, “Preparing for the Big Event,” which provided elementary and middle school teachers from across Middle Tennessee with strategies on how to incorporate the eclipse into subjects such as science, mathematics, language arts, art and music.

More than 4,000 years ago, Chung K’ang, the fourth emperor of the Hea dynasty in China, reportedly executed two astronomers named Hi and Ho because they didn’t predict a solar eclipse.

Tennessee State Representative Joe Pitts tries out a pair of solar glasses during a recent educational summit at APSU.

Tennessee State Representative Joe Pitts tries out a pair of solar glasses during a recent educational summit at APSU.

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Sections: Education | No Comments
 


NASA to use Spacecraft Orbiting Earth to track Air Pollution

 

Written by Steve Cole
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – For more than three decades NASA has focused its space-faring skills and science chops CSI-like on an elusive global killer. Later this month, that pursuit takes us to East Asia. In a few years, part way to the moon.

We are getting close.

Air pollution causes an estimated 152,000 deaths a year across the Americas and more than 2 million deaths in the Western Pacific, according to the United Nations. Some parts of the world have a detailed view of local air quality from ground sensor networks and forecast models that generate public alerts. But for much of the world this type of information and warning are not available.

Satellites have documented that human-produced and natural air pollution can travel a long way. This 2014 NASA satellite image shows a long river of dust from western Africa (bottom of image) push across the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

Satellites have documented that human-produced and natural air pollution can travel a long way. This 2014 NASA satellite image shows a long river of dust from western Africa (bottom of image) push across the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)

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NASA uses satellite data to solve questions about Earth’s rotational wobbles

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Using satellite data on how water moves around Earth, NASA scientists have solved two mysteries about wobbles in the planet’s rotation — one new and one more than a century old. The research may help improve our knowledge of past and future climate.

Although a desktop globe always spins smoothly around the axis running through its north and south poles, a real planet wobbles. Earth’s spin axis drifts slowly around the poles; the farthest away it has wobbled since observations began is 37 feet (12 meters).

Earth does not always spin on an axis running through its poles. Instead, it wobbles irregularly over time, drifting toward North America throughout most of the 20th Century (green arrow). That direction has changed drastically due to changes in water mass on Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Earth does not always spin on an axis running through its poles. Instead, it wobbles irregularly over time, drifting toward North America throughout most of the 20th Century (green arrow). That direction has changed drastically due to changes in water mass on Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA researchers explore growing Food Crops during long Deep Space Missions

 

Written by Linda Herridge
NASA’s John F. Kennedy Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationKennedy Space Center, FL – NASA plant physiologist Ray Wheeler, Ph.D., and fictional astronaut Mark Watney from the movie “The Martian” have something in common — they are both botanists. But that’s where the similarities end. While Watney is a movie character who gets stranded on Mars, Wheeler is the lead for Advanced Life Support Research activities in the Exploration Research and Technology Program at Kennedy Space Center, working on real plant research.

“The Martian movie and book conveyed a lot of issues regarding growing food and surviving on a planet far from the Earth,” Wheeler said. “It’s brought plants back into the equation.”

An artist concept depicts a greenhouse on the surface of Mars. Plants are growing with the help of red, blue and green LED light bars and a hydroponic cultivation approach. (SAIC)

An artist concept depicts a greenhouse on the surface of Mars. Plants are growing with the help of red, blue and green LED light bars and a hydroponic cultivation approach. (SAIC)

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