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Topic: Patrick Kirby

Fort Campbell Rakkasan Stays on Track

 

Written by Sgt. Patrick Kirby
40th Public Affairs Detachment

RakkasanFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell, KY – For some, the adrenaline rush reached while in the field is what they look for in an outlet. Some choose to skydive, some rock climb or even bungee jumping. One Soldier chooses something else…auto racing.

Autocross is a timed competition in which drivers navigate one at a time through a defined course on either a sealed or an unsealed surface. It is a form of motorsports that emphasizes safe competition and active participation.

Sgt. Aaron Daugherty, an infantryman assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), races his car on a race track in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Daugherty uses racing to relieve the everyday stresses he gets from being a Soldier. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

Sgt. Aaron Daugherty, an infantryman assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), races his car on a race track in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Daugherty uses racing to relieve the everyday stresses he gets from being a Soldier. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Three states, two times zones, Fort Campbell 3rd Brigade Combat Team’s culminating mission

 

Written by Sgt. Patrick Kirby
40th Public Affairs Detachment

RakkasanFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell, KY – Readiness is an Army priority, and training like this prepares Soldiers for various current and future threats. This readiness training took place at Fort Campbell’s training area in Tennessee, Fort Knox, Kentucky, and the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center at Camp Atterbury, Indiana.

“We’re training for a near peer threat,” said Cpt. Vincent Shaw, commander, C Company, 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division. “Anywhere that is similar strength and capacity as the United States.”

An infantryman from 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) provides cover fire with the M240B at Muscatatuck Urban Training Center at Camp Atterbury, Indiana on Dec. 7, 2018. This machine gun fire helped initiate one of the final days of the BCT training exercise which spanned Tennessee, Kentucky and two time zones. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

An infantryman from 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) provides cover fire with the M240B at Muscatatuck Urban Training Center at Camp Atterbury, Indiana on Dec. 7, 2018. This machine gun fire helped initiate one of the final days of the BCT training exercise which spanned Tennessee, Kentucky and two time zones. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Bats on Fort Campbell serve important role in Ecosystem

 

Written by Sgt. Patrick Kirby
40th Public Affairs Detachment, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – As the sun sets, the humidity lets up and temperatures drop, biologists from Fort Campbell Fish and Wildlife, Environmental Division, Directorate of Public Works, are just heading into work.

Their destination is Fort Campbell’s training area to do bat habitat assessments.

Anytime a tree larger than 3 inches in diameter is removed, an Endangered Species Act compliance survey must be completed.

There are two types of surveys, mist netting and Anabat. Mist nets are used by ornithologists and bat biologists to capture wild birds and bats for average counts and other projects. Anabat is an audio monitoring system that uses the ultrasonic echolocation calls of the bats for species identification and to monitor activity.

Morgan Torres, wildlife biologist, Fort Campbell Fish and Wildlife holds a female red bat on Fort Campbell, KY, July 18th, 2018. Eastern Red Bats are forrest dwelling bats and forage for insects at night. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

Morgan Torres, wildlife biologist, Fort Campbell Fish and Wildlife holds a female red bat on Fort Campbell, KY, July 18th, 2018. Eastern Red Bats are forrest dwelling bats and forage for insects at night. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

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101st Airborne Division Big 5 Rock band pays tribute to Gold Star Families

 

Written by Sgt. Patrick Kirby
40th Public Affairs Detachment, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – Select members of the 101st Airborne Division Band known as the Big 5 headed to Nashville Friday for a recording session at Columbia Studio A.

Columbia Studio A is part of Belmont University and the recording session provided a mutual training opportunity during which musicians of the 101st and Belmont graduate students could collaborate on a project.

The project: Record “Light of a Gold Star,” a song written by Air Force Lt. Col. John Stea, a Kentucky Air National Guard flight surgeon. Stea wrote the song as a tribute to Gold Star Families.

Spc. Michael Davis, pianist, 101st Airborne Division Air Assault Band plays the piano while recording ‘Light of the Gold Star’ at Columbia Studio A in Nashville on October 26. (US Army photo by Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th PAD)

Spc. Michael Davis, pianist, 101st Airborne Division Air Assault Band plays the piano while recording ‘Light of the Gold Star’ at Columbia Studio A in Nashville on October 26. (US Army photo by Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th PAD)

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101st Airborne Division Leaders attend Subterranean Training

 

Written by Sgt. Patrick Kirby  
40th Public Affairs Detachment, 101st Airborne Division 

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – Leaders from across the 101st Airborne Division attended a Subterranean Training course hosted by the Fort Benning Maneuver Center of Excellence throughout the month of July on Fort Campbell.

The Chief of Staff of the Army has directed that the Army take a look at dense urban environments and dense urban terrain specifically, as it builds readiness to respond to contingency operations in any location around the world.

The MCoE teams explained how they analyze all aspects of this environment within megacities, to include subterranean systems. The subterranean operational environment, which dates as far back as the American Civil War, continues to be one that is complex and can create significant challenges for today’s Soldier.

Soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) launch a surveillance robot into a unknown section of the subterranean training area to check what is behind doors and corners July 27 on Fort Campbell, KY. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

Soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) launch a surveillance robot into a unknown section of the subterranean training area to check what is behind doors and corners July 27 on Fort Campbell, KY. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Secretary of the Army Mark Esper visits Fort Campbell

 

Written by Pfc. Beverly Mejia
40th Public Affairs Detachment

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – The Secretary of the Army Mark T. Esper shared his recently published Army Vision with Soldiers, leaders, Families and civilians of the 101st Airborne Division and Fort Campbell, Tuesday during a visit to the post.

“The Army Vision speaks about where we want to be in the year 2028 and within that it outlines manning, training, equipping and leading,” Esper said.

As secretary of the Army, Esper has constitutional responsibility of all aspects in relation to the U.S. Army, to include organization, recruiting, equipping, training and supervision of more than 1.4 million active duty, Reserve and National Guard Soldiers, as well as Army civilians and their Families.

Secretary of the Army Dr. Mark T. Esper observes Soldiers as they maneuver through the air assault obstacle course at The Sabalauski Air Assault School July 10th, 2018 on Fort Campbell, Ky. The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) is the Army’s only air assault division. Air assault gives the division unique capabilities of quick and precise infiltration and exfiltration methods. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

Secretary of the Army Dr. Mark T. Esper observes Soldiers as they maneuver through the air assault obstacle course at The Sabalauski Air Assault School July 10th, 2018 on Fort Campbell, Ky. The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) is the Army’s only air assault division. Air assault gives the division unique capabilities of quick and precise infiltration and exfiltration methods. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Fort Campbell, Do not touch or remove Fawns from Habitat

 

Written by Sgt. Patrick Kirby
40th Public Affairs Detachment

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell,  KY – It is the season for fawns here on Fort Campbell, as does typically give birth in May and June.

The deer population on Fort Campbell is very dense, especially in the housing areas where hunting is not allowed.

When a doe gives birth its first instinct is to protect the fawn. The doe feeds her young every two to three hours.

Whenever the doe is out in the open with her fawn, the fawn is in danger of attacks from predators. Because she must continue to forage for food, she hides her fawns somewhere safe. Here on Fort Campbell that safe spot often is somewhere near houses in a flower bed or yard.

A rescued fawn prances around its enclosure Tuesday in Greenville, KY. A fawn that is removed from its safe hiding spot or is handled by humans are often abandoned because the doe cannot find it. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

A rescued fawn prances around its enclosure Tuesday in Greenville, KY. A fawn that is removed from its safe hiding spot or is handled by humans are often abandoned because the doe cannot find it. (Sgt. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Bald Eagles call Fort Campbell home

 

Written by Spc. Patrick Kirby
40th Public Affairs Detachment

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – Fort Campbell Fish and Wildlife officials have confirmed the first nesting of bald eagles on post.

“We, at Fish and Wildlife have suspected they were nesting in the past, but this is the first confirmed,” said Daniel Moss, avian ecologist with Fort Campbell Fish and Wildlife, that is part of the Directorate of Public Works.

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service “on August 9th, 2007, the bald eagle was removed from the federal list of threatened and endangered species. After nearly disappearing from most of the United States decades ago, the bald eagle is now flourishing across the nation and no longer needs the protection of the Endangered Species Act.” Eagles are now protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.

A bald eagle soars over Lake Kyle on Fort Campbell, April 18. The Bald Eagle was made the national symbol of the United States in 1782. Acting as the 101st Airborne Division mascot and as Americas’ mascot. (Spc. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

A bald eagle soars over Lake Kyle on Fort Campbell, April 18. The Bald Eagle was made the national symbol of the United States in 1782. Acting as the 101st Airborne Division mascot and as Americas’ mascot. (Spc. Patrick Kirby, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

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101st Airborne Division Artillery Brigade “Red Knights” hone air assault artillery capabilities

 

Written by Staff Sgt. Todd Pouliot
40th Public Affairs Detachment

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – As the battalion master gunner, it is Sgt. 1st Class Warren Jenkins’ duty to verify artillerymen from 3rd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 101st Airborne Division Artillery Brigade, 101st Airborne Division, are proficient in their artillery skills.

“As an artilleryman, it’s important for us to be able to support our maneuver brethren in the fight, wherever it may be,” Jenkins, said. “In order for us to provide timely, accurate, safe, fires, we have to go through a series of tables [performance tasks] to train up individually and collectively.”

The Red Knights battalion platoon-level artillery external evaluation, or Tables 11-12, is a twice-a-year exercise that concludes Friday. The training advances the battalion’s combat effectiveness and readiness.

Artillerymen from C Battery, 3rd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 101st Airborne Division Artillery Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), conduct a platoon-level external evaluation live-fire, Jan. 31, 2018, at a Fort Campbell, Kentucky, training area. This training is conducted twice a year and is part of progressive training evaluations which begin with individual testing, and continues through battalion-level. (Sgt. Sharifa Newton, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

Artillerymen from C Battery, 3rd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 101st Airborne Division Artillery Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), conduct a platoon-level external evaluation live-fire, Jan. 31, 2018, at a Fort Campbell, Kentucky, training area. This training is conducted twice a year and is part of progressive training evaluations which begin with individual testing, and continues through battalion-level. (Sgt. Sharifa Newton, 40th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Herpetofauna diversity on Fort Campbell

 

Written by Spc. Patrick Kirby
40th Public Affairs Detachment

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – “Snakes are unfairly persecuted in ways that are not tolerated for other animals, either domestic or wildlife.” said Dr. Chris Gienger, a herpetology professor at Austin Peay State University.

Spring is here and with it comes warmer weather. Families begin going out on hikes and enjoying the outdoors. Those people enjoying the outdoors should be mindful of the wildlife on and around Fort Campbell as they’re exploring. They should make sure to know what to look for while on the trail.

Herpetology is the branch of zoology which deals with the study of reptiles and amphibians such as snakes, turtles, and iguanas.

A Ribbon snake, a harmless, non-venomous, docile snake found near marshy areas. These snakes are found on Fort Campbell. (Spc. Patrick Kirby 40th Public Affairs Detachment.)

A Ribbon snake, a harmless, non-venomous, docile snake found near marshy areas. These snakes are found on Fort Campbell. (Spc. Patrick Kirby 40th Public Affairs Detachment.)

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