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IV: Are you ready for disaster? Gear, supplies and training

 

Editors Note: This is Chapter 4 in a reprint of this five-part series, published on Daily Kos and originally published online by AlphaGeek {9.9.05}. From the diaries — Plutonium Page. The series offers a practical way to assess risk and prepare a variety of disaster scenarios. The series will appear chapter by chapter at 3 p.m. through Friday.

In a great many ways, we live safer lives today than our parents and grandparents ever did. Western civilization’s emphasis on science and engineering has driven incredible progress in our understanding of the world. Because our understanding of the world is imperfect, and our social systems fractious and chaotic, we still make mistakes.

The result of this progress, unfortunately, is that much of Western civilization teeters precariously at the top of a technological pyramid. Remove the non-stop infusions of energy and goods, add a little natural or man-made disaster, and that balancing act rapidly devolves into chaos.

In this, the fourth installment of this series, we will discuss the material preparations required to support your emergency plans.

Yes, people, that means it’s time to talk about MREs, radios, and guns. (Actually, guns will be covered in part 5, but you get the idea.)

This is the fourth installment out of five in a multi-part series on personal disaster preparedness. Your humble correspondent is a Silicon Valley technical executive with both professional and personal experience in risk assessment and disaster-readiness planning. «Read the rest of this article»


III: Are you ready for disaster? Plan to survive!

 

Editors Note: This is Chapter 3 in a reprint of this five-part series, published on Daily Kos and origianally published online by AlphaGeek {9.9.05}. From the diaries — Plutonium Page. The series offers a practical way to assess risk and prepare a variety of disaster scenarios. The series will appear chapter by chapter at 3 p.m. through Friday.

“In the first 48 to 72 hours of an emergency, many Americans will have to look after themselves.”

— David Paulison, 2005 FEMA Director Nominee

Preparedness for emergency situations is not a solitary pursuit.

Each of us lives in the context of a larger society. Few among us could survive for long without the support of myriad other people and institutions we depend upon for our daily needs. A realistic disaster plan must balance these dependencies against the stark truth that you are likely to be required to survive outside this system for days or weeks at a time at some point in your life.

Being prepared for disaster does not have to be time-consuming or expensive. In this multi-part series of DailyKos Diaries, I will share with you, dear reader, many of the lessons I’ve learned regarding the most effective ways to prepare for an emergency.

This is the third installment in a multi-part series on personal disaster preparedness. Your humble correspondent is a Silicon Valley technical executive with both professional and personal experience in risk assessment and disaster-readiness planning. Links to reference materials, including planning guides and reference information, will be found at the end of the final Diaries in this series. «Read the rest of this article»


Bible distribution in school sparks controversy, taunting of Jewish students

 

One of the benefits of a U.S. Army Chaplain’s career was the opportunity to become friends with Jewish personnel, chaplains and retired officers.

Chaplain Joe Messing, of the Jewish faith, was one of my favorite Post Chaplains. At Fort Bliss, he was our religious leader and supervisor as Post Chaplain, attaining the rank of colonel or “full bird,” a rare achievement in the Army. He was fully qualified for both position and rank; many of us, during his sojourn, wished for him a promotion to General and selection of Chief of Chaplains.

My life was enriched through fellowship with Jewish active duty and retired soldiers. Having such a healthy relationship with them, I am disturbed by the discrimination against students in Texas who adhere to the Jewish faith.

In a story from Church and State News, I read that Plano, Texas, students were pressured by classmates to pick up copies of the New Testament and were taunted when they declined. «Read the rest of this article»




II. Are you ready for disaster? Plan to survive!

 

Editors Note: This is Chapter 2 in a reprint of this five-part series, published on Daily Kos and originally published online by AlphaGeek {9.9.05}. From the diaries — Plutonium Page. The series offers a practical way to assess risk and prepare a variety of disaster scenarios. The series will appear chapter by chapter at 3 p.m. through Friday.

Chance favors the prepared mind. – Louis Pasteur

In any given disaster situation, you will find a group of people who maximize their chances for survival by making the correct choices before, during, and after the crisis. These folks have a few things in common:

  • Each of them personally decided that he/she was going to survive
  • They accurately assessed their immediate and near-term risks and needs
  • They made the best plan they could based on available resources
  • They executed that plan in a flexible, adaptive manner
  • They kept going until they had reached safety, and did not give up

The single most important thing you can do to survive a disaster is to be mentally prepared.

Being prepared for disaster does not have to be time-consuming or expensive. In this multi-part series of DailyKos Diaries, I will share with you, dear reader, many of the lessons I’ve learned regarding the most effective ways to prepare for an emergency.

This is the second installment in a multi-part series on personal disaster preparedness. Your humble correspondent is a Silicon Valley technical executive with both professional and personal experience in risk assessment and disaster-readiness planning. «Read the rest of this article»


I. Are you ready for disaster? Assess your risk

 

Editors Note: We are offering a reprint of this five-part article, published on Daily Kos and originally published online by AlphaGeek {9.9.05}. From the diaries — Plutonium Page. The series offers a practical way to assess risk and prepare a variety of disaster scenarios. The series will appear chapter by chapter at 3 p.m. today through Friday.

Something bad is going to happen, and there’s nothing you can do to stop it.

Preparing to deal with a disaster is like going off of a ski jump. If you put off your planning until things start happening, it’s far too late to make much of a difference. Once you’re headed down that ski jump, the time for planning and preparation is over.

On the other hand, being prepared for disaster does not have to be time-consuming or expensive. In this multi-part series of DailyKos Diaries, I will share with you, dear reader, many of the lessons I’ve learned regarding the most effective ways to prepare for an emergency.

This is the first installment in a multi-part series on personal disaster preparedness. Your humble correspondent is a Silicon Valley technical executive with both professional and personal experience in risk assessment and disaster-readiness planning. Links to reference materials, including planning guides and reference information, will be found at the end of the final Diaries in this series. «Read the rest of this article»


“Kids & Cops” draws hundreds to meet and greet area police officers

 

In the baking heat of the K-Mart parking lot on Wilma Rudolph Boulevard, with throngs of exhaust-spewing cars clogging the lot, stalwart members of the Clarksville Police Department, Montgomery County Sheriff’s Department, Fort Campbell Military Police, and members of the Clarksville Citizen Police, gathered Saturday for a “Cops and Kids” day, an event designed to introduce local youngsters to those whose mission it is to ‘serve and protect.”

Mounted Officer Cristel Patterson with one of her fans at "Kids and Cops"

Kaye Jones, president of the Citizens Police said the program was designed “to introduce children to local law enforcement in a positive way. Too many times youngsters first encounter police in instances of domestic violence, of accidents or disasters, or some other negative instance. This is another view of our law enforcement officers and what they do.” It is the second year this program has been held. «Read the rest of this article»


Tax-free weekend stretches the family dollar on back-to-school shopping

 

Get ready to shop.

With the opening of school just around the corner, parents will reap the benefit of a three-day tax-free shopping weekend (August 1-3) just in time to stock up on school supplies, clothing and even a computer — anything needed to get the school year off to a good start. All without paying the 9.5% sales reaped by state and local government.

The battle for bargains kicks off at one minute past midnight tonight, and will continue through Sunday at midnight (if your favorite store is open that late).

What can you buy?

School clothing (items must be priced at $100 or less, which means no $130 deluxe sneakers), all the paper, pencils, notepads, binders, art supplies and other items your child will to start the school year off right. Need a computer? Anything valued at $1500 or less is tax exempt. At 9.5%, thats a saving of $142 and change. «Read the rest of this article»




McGavock High School band camp at APSU

 

McGavock High School band held bandcamp on the APSU campus this week. The band will conduct a free concert performance for parents and the general public 6:30pm tonight (July 31) at Governor’s Stadium. Clarksville Online caught up with the group during their rehearsal this Wednesday evening.

Here are the photos we took the following day at their concert performance. «Read the rest of this article»


First Friday Film: The Power of Nightmares

 

The Power of Nightmares (Part 1) is being shown this Friday, August 1, at 7 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 3053 Highway 41A South. The screening is a continuation of the UU First Friday Film program.

Adam Curtis showed us in Century of Self a key way of controlling the masses is by making people good consumers. Make people want things they do not need by appealing to their secret desires. Come to present time in The Power of Nightmares, where terror and torture and the fear of such has become the new tools of control by governments.

About the movie: For a time politicians promised to create a better world. When this dream lost its promise, politicians were simply seen as managers. Their power to control has returned as their job became rescuing us from dreadful dangers. Much of the terrorism threat is a fantasy that is an exaggerated and distorted dark illusion spread by governments, security services, and the international media. «Read the rest of this article»


Organizations invited to apply for ABC grants for art activities

 

The Clarksville Arts & Heritage Development Council invites organizations seeking funding for artistic and cultural projects that benefit the community to apply for an Arts Build Communities (ABC) grant. A free grant workshop and information session will be held in the auditorium of the Customs House Museum, 200 S Second Street, in downtown Clarksville on Thursday, July 31, at 3:00pm for interested applicants. While this workshop is not mandatory for applicants, first-time applicants are strongly encouraged to attend.

Arts Build Communities (ABC) is a program funded by the Tennessee General Assembly and administered by the Clarksville Arts & Heritage Development Council (AHDC) in cooperation with the Tennessee Arts Commission (TAC). ABC grants offer financial support for arts projects in all disciplines such as dance, music, opera/musical theater, theater, visual arts, design arts, crafts, photography, media arts, literature, interdisciplinary, and folk arts. «Read the rest of this article»




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