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Topic: Hindu Kush Mountains

NASA studies Asia Mountains Water Cycle

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says that for more than a billion people, Asia’s high mountain ranges, Himalaya, Karakoram, and Hindu Kush, are the names of their most reliable water source.

Snow and glaciers in these mountains contain the largest volume of freshwater outside of Earth’s polar ice sheets, leading hydrologists to nickname this region the Third Pole. One-seventh of the world’s population depends on rivers flowing from these mountains for water to drink and to irrigate crops.

Follow the Freshwater: By predicting droughts and floods and tracking blooms of algae, NASA’s view of freshwater around the globe helps people manage their water. (NASA/ Katy Mersmann)

Follow the Freshwater: By predicting droughts and floods and tracking blooms of algae, NASA’s view of freshwater around the globe helps people manage their water. (NASA/ Katy Mersmann)

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101st Airborne Division Soldier reflects on call to duty while on 9th Deployment during Global War on Terror

 

Written by 1st Lt. Daniel Johnson
2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

101st Sustainment Brigade - LifelinersFort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne Division

Northern Iraq – Following the attacks of September 11th, then Pfc. Brian Bailey prepared for war along with the rest of the U.S Army. When he arrived to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, home of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), he was immediately called to duty.

“Who wants to deploy right now?” asked the Soldier who ran the replacement company. Bailey and one other man raised their hands and they were separated from the group. A few weeks later they were in Afghanistan.

Sgt. 1st Class Brian Bailey, the first sergeant of Company A, 1st Battalion 26th Infantry Regiment, Task Force Strike, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), waits for Soldiers to arrive to a security patrol briefing, Dec. 7, 2016, in northern Iraq. This is Bailey's 9th deployment during the Global War on Terror, and he has spent over 7 years deployed. As part of Operation Inherent Resolve, he is part of a multi-national effort advising and assisting the Iraqi security forces. (1st Lt. Daniel Johnson)

Sgt. 1st Class Brian Bailey, the first sergeant of Company A, 1st Battalion 26th Infantry Regiment, Task Force Strike, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), waits for Soldiers to arrive to a security patrol briefing, Dec. 7, 2016, in northern Iraq. This is Bailey’s 9th deployment during the Global War on Terror, and he has spent over 7 years deployed. As part of Operation Inherent Resolve, he is part of a multi-national effort advising and assisting the Iraqi security forces. (1st Lt. Daniel Johnson)

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High ground gives Soldiers advantage over Taliban

 

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionKunar Province, Afghanistan – They knew where the enemy was March 13th, and they had a plan. The Taliban had been attacking them from what was considered a safe haven because of the terrain.

The Soldiers from Company B, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, of the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, needed to break the Taliban of their habit.

“The insurgents use the same fighting positions their grandfathers used with the Mujahadeen against the Soviets, so they’re creatures of habit,” said U.S. Army Capt. Ryan A. McLaughlin, commander, Co. B., 2nd Bn., 327th Inf., TF No Slack. “And they stick with what works.”

Silhouetted by the rising sun, a Soldier with Task Force No Slack, steps over concertina wire after leaving a mountaintop observation post during a 12-hour combat patrol in Chowkay District's Dewegal Valley in eastern Afghanistan's Kunar Province March 13th. The area was a known Taliban hideout and the Soldiers were engaged periodically throughout the day. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

Silhouetted by the rising sun, a Soldier with Task Force No Slack, steps over concertina wire after leaving a mountaintop observation post during a 12-hour combat patrol in Chowkay District's Dewegal Valley in eastern Afghanistan's Kunar Province March 13th. The area was a known Taliban hideout and the Soldiers were engaged periodically throughout the day. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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Most Dangerous Road in Afghanistan

 

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogne

Afghanistan – A multimedia piece on a U.S. Army convoy on the last leg of the famed Grand Trunk Highway. The Jalalabad – Kabul highway snakes it’s way along the Kabul Gorge between the Hindu Kush Mountains. It is an essential route for caravans heading into Afghanistan’s capital city of Kabul.

Late February 28th, it was an essential route for Soldiers from Forward Support Company G, 2nd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, Task Force Balls, escorting a convoy through the shadow of the mountains.

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Observation Post Mustang

 

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Kunar Province, Afghanistan – A multimedia audio-slideshow on how U.S. Army Soldiers from Troop C, 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, Task Force Bandit, fight and live at Observation Post Mustang on the border of Pakistan in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province.

At the remote base 6,500 feet up in the Hindu Kush Mountains, the Soldiers have the task of providing security for the Afghans and Americans living in the valleys below.

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Brotherhood at the top of Afghanistan

 

Written by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionKunar Province, Afghanistan – At the highest observation post in northeastern, a brotherhood of U.S. Army Soldiers protects a small valley that feeds into the Kunar River Valley.

Surrounded by snow-capped mountains and freezing winds a few kilometers from the Pakistan border, Observation Post Mustang weathers storms and waves of Taliban fighters.

Soldiers from Troop C, 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, Task Force Bandit, of the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, stay vigilant day and night at the small, outpost located in the Hindu Kush Mountains mountains 6,500 feet above Kunar Province.

From a remote observation post high up in the Hindu Kush Mountains on the border of Pakistan, U.S. Army Sgt. Matthew B. Sorrell stands guard overlooking “Rocket Ridge” at Observation Post Mustang in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Jan. 25th. The Soldiers named the ridge Rocket Ridge because the Taliban use it to fire rockets at them before they suppressed the area. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

From a remote observation post high up in the Hindu Kush Mountains on the border of Pakistan, U.S. Army Sgt. Matthew B. Sorrell stands guard overlooking “Rocket Ridge” at Observation Post Mustang in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Jan. 25th. The Soldiers named the ridge Rocket Ridge because the Taliban use it to fire rockets at them before they suppressed the area. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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Mortarman shares close calls, passion for his job

 

Written by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell
Task Force Bastogne Public

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneKunar Province, Afghanistan – He’s a calm individual. His voice is barely above a whisper.

Maybe because waiting for the enemy to attack in a hastily built fighting position in the Hindu Kush Mountains makes everybody whisper. Maybe because he doesn’t get that excited anymore.

Whatever the reason, he rarely raises his voice when asked about his three combat tours during his seven years in the Army.

Rarely. Except when he talks about blowing things up.

U.S. Army Spc. Corey C. Canterbury, a mortarman from Ocean Springs, MS, assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, kneels down after firing a mortar round on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan Dec. 11th. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Spc. Corey C. Canterbury, a mortarman from Ocean Springs, MS, assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, kneels down after firing a mortar round on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan Dec. 11th. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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Operation Eagle Claw II: Visiting the Taliban at home

 

Written by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionKunar Province, Afghanistan – Whoop. Whoop. Whoop. The sounds of helicopters echoed through the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province the morning of December 10th.

Swarming, then hovering as expertly as hummingbirds, the CH-47 Chinooks and UH-60 Black Hawks dropped their cargo simultaneously on multiple ridges overlooking the Taliban stronghold only a few kilometers from the Pakistan border.

U.S. Army Spc. Joshua R. Wood, a mortar man from Pontotoc, MS, assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, uses his entrenching tool to fill sandbags for his fighting position on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 10th. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Spc. Joshua R. Wood, a mortar man from Pontotoc, MS, assigned to Bayonet Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force No Slack, uses his entrenching tool to fill sandbags for his fighting position on a mountainside overlooking the Ganjgal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Dec. 10th. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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