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Topic: Military Working Dogs

101st Airborne’s 510th Military Police Detachment Continues to Support Operations Overseas

 

101st Sustainment Brigade - LifelinersFort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell, KY – The 510th Military Police Detachment, 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division provides continuous service to the community and the nation for training and fielding Military Working Dogs (MWDs). From providing unique patrol, explosives and narcotic detection capabilities through law enforcement on Fort Campbell, Kentucky to deploying into combat zones such as Iraq and Afghanistan, the 510th Military Police Detachment is staying busy.

Sergeant Megan Hurley and Military Working Dog Bill from the 510th Military Police Detachment (MWD), 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Sustainment Brigade, prepare to fast rope out of a UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter during pre-deployment training. (1st Lt. M. Austin Giles, 510th Military Police Detachment (MWD), 716th Military Police Battalion)

Sergeant Megan Hurley and Military Working Dog Bill from the 510th Military Police Detachment (MWD), 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Sustainment Brigade, prepare to fast rope out of a UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter during pre-deployment training. (1st Lt. M. Austin Giles, 510th Military Police Detachment (MWD), 716th Military Police Battalion)

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Canine Capabilities at Bagram Afghanistan

 

Written by Robert Harrison
U.S. Forces Afghanistan

U.S. Forces AfghanistanBagram Airfield, Afghanistan – They look like normal everyday dogs with their tails wagging. But when given the right command by the right person, military working dogs “snap-to,” just like the disciplined Soldiers they protect.

Working alongside U.S. service members throughout the world, military working dogs are a dedicated, reliable battlefield companion to the military police (MP) handler. They are always on guard to protect the team, either through bomb detection or when necessary aggressive protection.

U.S. Army Sgt. Ethan Taylor takes his military working dog Alex through some obstacle course drills. Taylor and Alex are assigned to the U.S. Forces Afghanistan Military Working Dog Detachment. Alex is a six-year-old male German Shepherd. Both Taylor and Alex deployed from Fort Drum, N.Y. (Bob Harrison, U.S. Forces Afghanistan Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Sgt. Ethan Taylor takes his military working dog Alex through some obstacle course drills. Taylor and Alex are assigned to the U.S. Forces Afghanistan Military Working Dog Detachment. Alex is a six-year-old male German Shepherd. Both Taylor and Alex deployed from Fort Drum, N.Y. (Bob Harrison, U.S. Forces Afghanistan Public Affairs)

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Fort Campbell 1st Brigade Combat Team military working dog Mimsy rescues handler

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class John D. Brown
1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division PAO

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Kunar Province, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Sgt. Mimsy is a military working dog with 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, trained in personal protection and the detection of explosive devices and is currently serving in Kunar province, Afghanistan.

Military working dogs have been an indispensible asset for the armed forces since the first “K-9 Corps” began in 1942.

U.S. Army Spc. Matt Kreutzer, a military working dog handler with 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, and Sgt. Mimsy, a military working dog, stop for a photo during training at Forward Operating Base Wright, Kunar province, Afghanistan. Mimsy was recently released from quarantine after rescuing Kreutzer from a feral dog during a recent foot patrol. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Shawn Vradenburg, Provincial Reconstruction Team Kunar)

U.S. Army Spc. Matt Kreutzer, a military working dog handler with 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, and Sgt. Mimsy, a military working dog, stop for a photo during training at Forward Operating Base Wright, Kunar province, Afghanistan. Mimsy was recently released from quarantine after rescuing Kreutzer from a feral dog during a recent foot patrol. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Shawn Vradenburg, Provincial Reconstruction Team Kunar)

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Man’s best friend plays pivotal role in IED defeat

 

Written by U.S. Army Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton
3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division PAO

RakkasanFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Khowst Province, Afghanistan – One asset being used today against roadside bombs is a different type of tool often seen on the battlefield.

The fact that it isn’t another electronic item stored away in a backpack or vehicle is a change for some Soldiers.

Military working dogs have worked hand-in-hand with the military for decades as guard dogs or attack dogs. However, Soldiers are now seeing more and more bomb sniffing dogs going on missions with them.

Spc. Hugo, explosive detection dog with the Tactical Explosive Detection Dog program assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), obeys the order to stay and watched his handler’s gestures carefully on Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan, Feb. 26, 2013. The TEDD program partners Soldiers and dogs to assist in finding road side bombs in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. photo by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton Task Force 3/101 Public Affairs)

Spc. Hugo, explosive detection dog with the Tactical Explosive Detection Dog program assigned to 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), obeys the order to stay and watched his handler’s gestures carefully on Forward Operating Base Salerno, Afghanistan, Feb. 26, 2013. The TEDD program partners Soldiers and dogs to assist in finding road side bombs in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. photo by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton Task Force 3/101 Public Affairs)

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101st Pathfinders work with Man’s Best Friend

 

Video by U.S. Army

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionWings of DestinyBagram Airfield, Afghanistan – The 101st Pathfinders, with the 101st Aviation Regiment, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade work with Military Working Dogs and their handlers to train for combat.

The Task Force Destiny Pathfinders are the only organic infantry unit in a combat aviation brigade.

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Military working dogs join Task Force Currahee

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. Luther L. Boothe Jr.
Task Force Currahee Public Affairs

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionThe CurraheesPaktika Province, Afghanistan — A typical work day may include a nice walk, a brush of the hair, some chow or just gnawing on a chew toy, but do not be fooled, U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Bodro, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Beny and U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Enyzi are in Afghanistan to work.

Task Force Currahee’s newest team members are military working dogs. They are trained and certified to seek and find improvised explosive devices, bomb making material, narcotics and paraphernalia, and are qualified patrol or attack dogs. The canines arrived January 13th and are scheduled to remain with TF Currahee until the end of 4th Brigade Combat Team’s rotation.

Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan - U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Enyzi, a 3-year-old Belgian Tervuren military working dog attached to Task Force Currahee, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, takes a break from training to pause for a photo Dec. 15th at Bagram Airfield. (CourtesyPhoto)

Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan - U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Enyzi, a 3-year-old Belgian Tervuren military working dog attached to Task Force Currahee, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, takes a break from training to pause for a photo Dec. 15th at Bagram Airfield. (CourtesyPhoto)

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