Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Random House

Clarksville Writers’ Conference Speakers Again Are Tops

 

Clarksville Writers ConferenceClarksville, TN – From comic book contributors to best-selling romance writers to illustrators and more, the writers at this year’s Clarksville Writers’ Conference, sponsored by the Clarksville-Montgomery County Arts and Heritage Development Council, was again not only informative but full of essential hints that lead would-be-writers to success.

A heavy emphasis on self-publication was a new feature for conference goers. Many of the authors were either Clarksville or Middle Tennessee natives, including the keynote speaker Jim Squires or Crockett White, a Nashville native and author of West End among several other books.

Michel Stone presenting "Pursuing Your Passon: One Novelist's Advice on Staying the Course" at the 2016 Clarksville Writer's Conference.

Michel Stone presenting “Pursuing Your Passon: One Novelist’s Advice on Staying the Course” at the 2016 Clarksville Writer’s Conference.

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Margery Allingham is a Mystery Writer You Should Know

 
Margery Allingham

Margery Allingham

Clarksville, TN – Margery Allingham is considered one of the four “Queens of Crime” along with Agatha Christie, Ngaio Marsh, and Dorothy L. Sayers. Margery was born in Ealing, London in 1904. Her father, Herbert John Allingham was editor of the Christian Globe and the New London Journal (for which Margery later wrote articles and Secton Blake stories). Her mother, Emily Jane Allingham, was also a contributor of stories to women’s magazines.

Margery’s aunt, Maud Hughes, ran a magazine where Margery published her first story when she was eight years old.

The family moved to the village of Layer Breton when Margery was a baby. She went to school there but returned to London in 1920 where she attended Regent Street Polytechnic. Studying drama and speech-training, Margery was able to cure a stammer she had suffered throughout her childhood. She also met her future husband, Philip Youngman Carter, at this school; he later collaborated with her and designed jackets for many of her books after they married in 1928. «Read the rest of this article»

 

Clarksville author Toni Aleo will be at Hastings Saturday, May 18th

 

Toni AleoClarksville, TN – On Saturday, May 18th, Clarksville based author Toni Aleo will be signing print-on-demand versions of her books at Hastings from 1:00pm until 3:00pm.

Toni Aleo is a publishing dream. Toni started out as a self-published author of three hockey romances; “Trying To Score”, “Taking Shots”, and “Empty Net”, centered around the fictional Nashville Assassins hockey team.

Toni Aleo

Toni Aleo

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Sections: Events | No Comments
 


Banned Books Week highlights the censored

 

Clarksville, TN – During the last week of September every year, hundreds of libraries and bookstores around the country draw attention to the problem of censorship by mounting displays of challenged books and hosting a variety of events. The 2011 celebration of Banned Books Week will be held from September 24 through October 1. Banned Books Week is the only national celebration of the freedom to read.

It was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. More than 11,000 books have been challenged since 1982.

There are hundreds of challenges to books in schools and libraries in the United States every year. According to the American Library Association (ALA), there were at least 348 in 2010; the ALA estimates that 70 to 80 percent are never reported.

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Sections: News | No Comments
 

Mystery Writers You Should Know: Margery Allingham

 
Margery Allingham

Margery Allingham

Margery Allingham is considered one of the four “Queens of Crime” along with Agatha Christie, Ngaio Marsh, and Dorothy L. Sayers. Margery was born in Ealing, London in 1904. Her father, Herbert John Allingham was editor of the Christian Globe and the New London Journal (for which Margery later wrote articles and Secton Blake stories). Her mother, Emily Jane Allingham, was also a contributor of stories to women’s magazines.

Margery’s aunt, Maud Hughes, ran a magazine where Margery published her first story when she was eight years old.

The family moved to the village of Layer Breton when Margery was a baby. She went to school there but returned to London in 1920 where she attended Regent Street Polytechnic. Studying drama and speech-training, Margery was able to cure a stammer she had suffered throughout her childhood. She also met her future husband, Philip Youngman Carter, at this school; he later collaborated with her and designed jackets for many of her books after they married in 1928. «Read the rest of this article»

 



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