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Topic: Type 2 Diabetes

FDA approves new treatment for a type of Heart Failure

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Silver Spring, MD – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Farxiga (dapagliflozin) oral tablets for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

Heart failure occurs when the heart does not pump enough blood to support the body’s needs, and this type of heart failure happens when the heart’s main pumping chamber, the left ventricle, is weakened.

FDA approves drug for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

FDA approves drug for adults with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure.

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Coalition for Better Health Created to Lead Policy Change in Tennessee

 

Coalition for Better HealthNashville, TN – There’s a new organization devoted to improving health conditions and battling chronic, behavior-related diseases in Tennessee. The Coalition for Better Health represents the first statewide nonprofit aimed at encouraging improvements in public and institutional health policies.

The Coalition will coordinate and lead efforts to improve health conditions in Tennessee through advocacy, research, and coordination among the public and private sectors.

Statewide, nonprofit organization is launched to improve health outcomes.

Statewide, nonprofit organization is launched to improve health outcomes.

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BACH Nursing research “Round-Up” shares best practices, advancements for patient care

 

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH)Fort Campbell, KY – A nursing team from the Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH) Intensive Care Unit was recognized for their clinical research and hope to share their study with nurses from across the military at a TriService Nursing Research Conference next year.

The TriService Nursing Research Program’s Research and Evidence-based Practice Dissemination course is a networking opportunity for Army, Navy and Air Force nursing professionals to present and share their research examining process improvement in military healthcare delivery systems and patient care.

U.S. Army Capt. Tori Meyer, a registered nurse, and federal employee Sherry Wood, a medical support assistant, both from Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky, presented their team’s research project during the hospital’s Nursing Round-Up. (U.S Army photo by Maria Yager)

U.S. Army Capt. Tori Meyer, a registered nurse, and federal employee Sherry Wood, a medical support assistant, both from Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky, presented their team’s research project during the hospital’s Nursing Round-Up. (U.S Army photo by Maria Yager)

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American Heart Association says Maintaining Weight Loss beneficial for people with Type 2 Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association people with Type 2 diabetes who regained weight forfeited the initial benefits of reduced risk of heart disease or stroke compared to those who maintained their weight loss.

Regaining weight previously lost is common and can deteriorate the initial benefits of lowered heart disease or stroke risks.

Keeping off at least 75% of lost weight sustained or improved the initial benefits. (American Heart Association)

Keeping off at least 75% of lost weight sustained or improved the initial benefits. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sleeping less than Six Hours and Heart Disease, Stroke – Deadly Combo

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association, middle-aged adults with high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke could be at high risk for cancer and early death when sleeping less than six hours per day.

Bar graph showing that for people who slept less than 6 hours, the risk of early death associated with hypertension or diabetes was two times higher, while the risk of early death associated with heart disease or stroke was three times higher. (Fernandez-Mendoza et al; Journal of the American Heart Association)

Bar graph showing that for people who slept less than 6 hours, the risk of early death associated with hypertension or diabetes was two times higher, while the risk of early death associated with heart disease or stroke was three times higher. (Fernandez-Mendoza et al; Journal of the American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Former NFL Players may face higher risk of Atrial Fibrillation

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Former National Football League players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AFib) compared to men of similar age who did not play professional football, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Former NFL athletes had lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and had lower resting heart rates compared to the control group, yet the incidence of atrial fibrillation was still higher. (American Heart Association)

Former NFL athletes had lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and had lower resting heart rates compared to the control group, yet the incidence of atrial fibrillation was still higher. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sugar Added Labels on packaged foods, beverages could lower Heart Disease/Diabetes risk, Cut Healthcare Costs

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation shows a label showing added sugars content on all packaged foods and sugary drinks could have substantial health and cost-saving benefits in the United States over the next 20 years .

Using a validated model, researchers were able to estimate a significant reduction in cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes cases from 2018 to 2037, if such a mandated addition to the Nutrition Label was implemented.

Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

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American College of Cardiology / American Heart Association Guidance for Preventing Heart Disease, Stroke

 

American Heart Association 

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – The choices we make every day can have a lasting effect on our heart and vascular health. Adopting a heart healthy eating plan, getting more exercise, avoiding tobacco and managing known risk factors are among the key recommendations in the 2019 Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease guideline from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA).

Also, it is recommended that aspirin should only rarely be used to help prevent heart attacks and stroke in people without known cardiovascular disease.

4 chambers of the heart: right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle. (American Heart Association)

4 chambers of the heart: right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says better options needed for Children at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXObesity and severe obesity in childhood and adolescence have been added to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk for premature heart disease, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (American Heart Association)

New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Breastfeeding may help protect Mothers against Stroke

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only good for babies, there is growing evidence it may also reduce the risk for stroke in post-menopausal women who reported breastfeeding at least one child, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death among women aged 65 and older, and is the third leading cause of death among Hispanic and black women aged 65 and older, according to the study.

The association between breastfeeding and lower risk of stroke was stronger in women who breastfed for longer than six months and for black women. (American Heart Association)

The association between breastfeeding and lower risk of stroke was stronger in women who breastfed for longer than six months and for black women. (American Heart Association)

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