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Topic: Grand Rivers KY

Fort Campbell engineers receive USACE overview, tour Kentucky Lock Addition Project

 

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersGrand Rivers, KY – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District commander Lt. Col. Sonny Avichal welcomed Maj. Gen. (ret) Bryan Watson and Army Combat engineers from Fort Campbell’s 326th Engineer Battalion, 101st Airborne Division, for an overview and tour of the Kentucky Lock Addition Project.

“We are glad you are here,” said Avichal. “This is a great opportunity for you to see a different part of the regiment that you don’t normally see as combat engineers.”

Jeremiah Manning, resident engineer for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project explains construction of the downstream coffer dam with concrete shells that will also be part of the permanent lock wall to combat engineers from Fort Campbell’s 326th Engineer Battalion, 101st Airborne Division during a tour at the Kentucky Lock Addition Project in Grand Rivers, KY. (Mark Rankin, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District)

Jeremiah Manning, resident engineer for the Kentucky Lock Addition Project explains construction of the downstream coffer dam with concrete shells that will also be part of the permanent lock wall to combat engineers from Fort Campbell’s 326th Engineer Battalion, 101st Airborne Division during a tour at the Kentucky Lock Addition Project in Grand Rivers, KY. (Mark Rankin, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District)

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Dams saved $1.72 billion in Flood Damage

 

Written by Leon Roberts
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN –  The 10 dams operated by the U.S. Corps of Engineers in the Cumberland River Basin performed as designed during the wettest February on record, saving an estimated $1.72 billion in would-be flood damage to the region.

The ability to hold back water where possible reduced impacts in Nashville by as much as 16 feet, preventing $1.5 billion of damage that would have resulted from higher water. The water level on the Cumberland River in Music City reached 40.93 feet with projects operating, but would have reached an estimated 57.2 feet if the storage projects upstream were not in existence.

Dale Hollow Dam on the Obey River in Celina, Tennessee, discharges water March 4th, 2019. (Don Busbice, USACE)

Dale Hollow Dam on the Obey River in Celina, Tennessee, discharges water March 4th, 2019. (Don Busbice, USACE)

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Dodging the Roadkill: Cindy’s On The Barge

 

Dodging the Roadkill - A Biker's JourneyHardin, KY – On a sunny Sunday afternoon, I was taking my wife on our weekly “2-up” ride. I had discovered some new roads that I wanted to show her and decided we would land at either Kenlake Marina, or Barkley Lodge. I had planned for us to stop for lunch at one of the two destinations.

My route was to take highway 41 to Hopkinsville, then ride highway 164 over to Cadiz. It’s an absolutely breathtaking view of the Kentucky countryside with tree covered stretches of highway and open roads that only the Kentucky back roads can provide.

We come out on highway 68/80 at the bridge. From there, you can get to Land Between the Lakes, or as we did, take off for Grand Rivers, KY.  It’s a great ride if you haven’t been.   

Cindy's On The Barge

Cindy’s On The Barge

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Water Management Center passes Harvey runoff through Cheatham Dam, Barkley Dam

 

Written by Leon Roberts
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Water Management Center is working this morning to manage runoff from last night’s heavy rainfall from remnants of Hurricane Harvey down the Cumberland River through Cheatham Dam in Ashland City, Tennessee, and Barkley Dam in Grand Rivers, Kentucky.

Six to nine inches of rain fell into the uncontrolled watershed between Old Hickory Dam and Cheatham Dam, the metro Nashville area, and particularly areas to the north and west of Nashville.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Water Management Center is passing water through Cheatham Dam on the Cumberland River in Ashland City, Tenn., at a rate exceeding 90,000 cubic feet per second. Six to nine inches of rain from the remnants of Hurricane Harvey fell into the Cumberland River watershed and is flowing into Cheatham Lake in Tennessee and Barkley Lake in Kentucky. Cheatham Lock is closed because of the strong currents flowing through the dam. (Mark Rankin)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Water Management Center is passing water through Cheatham Dam on the Cumberland River in Ashland City, Tenn., at a rate exceeding 90,000 cubic feet per second. Six to nine inches of rain from the remnants of Hurricane Harvey fell into the Cumberland River watershed and is flowing into Cheatham Lake in Tennessee and Barkley Lake in Kentucky. Cheatham Lock is closed because of the strong currents flowing through the dam. (Mark Rankin)

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Dedicated workers keep river projects operating during ‘Snowzilla’

 

Written by Leon Roberts
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN – A handful of dedicated workers are being lauded by Corps of Engineers officials for keeping hydropower plants operating and navigation locks open when snow and ice inundated portions of the Cumberland River and Tennessee River basins in January.

Lt. Col. Stephen Murphy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District commander, said when others justifiably stayed home, there were a few in the district that made it their mission to keep working despite the winter weather and hazardous conditions that existed January 22nd-24th.

A commercial tow enters Cheatham Lock during a major snow storm at the project in Ashland City, TN Jan. 22nd, 2016. A dozen U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees were recognized for their actions to keep navigation locks and hydropower plants operating when rural roads were treacherous and made it difficult for personnel to report to work. Employees worked extra shifts, slept at projects, and braved the elements in some cases to keep producing hydroelectricity and commerce moving along the waterways in the Cumberland River and Tennessee River Basins. (Park Ranger Mike Kuntz)

A commercial tow enters Cheatham Lock during a major snow storm at the project in Ashland City, TN Jan. 22nd, 2016. A dozen U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District employees were recognized for their actions to keep navigation locks and hydropower plants operating when rural roads were treacherous and made it difficult for personnel to report to work. (Park Ranger Mike Kuntz)

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Motor Vessel Mississippi makes stops on the Tennessee River, Cumberland River, docks in Clarksville

 

Written by Leon Roberts
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN – The Mississippi River Commission recently navigated the Tennessee River and Cumberland River to gain a fresh perspective for the development of plans to improve the condition of the Mississippi River Basin, foster navigation, promote commerce, and reduce flood risk.

The commission met with stakeholders while inspecting the waterways and visited U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and Tennessee Valley Authority projects.

The Motor Vessel Mississippi made a brief stop at McGregor Park in Clarksville, Tenn., Aug. 11, 2015, during a recent stop along the Cumberland River. The vessel is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ largest diesel towboat and flagship to the Mississippi River Commission, which is inspecting Corps of Engineers projects along the Cumberland River as part of the commission’s annual low water inspection trip. (Mark Rankin, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District)

The Motor Vessel Mississippi made a brief stop at McGregor Park in Clarksville, Tenn., Aug. 11, 2015, during a recent stop along the Cumberland River. The vessel is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ largest diesel towboat and flagship to the Mississippi River Commission, which is inspecting Corps of Engineers projects along the Cumberland River as part of the commission’s annual low water inspection trip. (Mark Rankin, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District)

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Land Between the Lakes to offer Winter Birding and Eagle Viewing Opportunities

 

Land Between the Lakes - LBLGolden Pond, KY – Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area offers the public eagle viewing opportunities. Winter is the time to team up with a naturalist to spot these magnificent birds.

On Saturday, January 17th, spend time visiting some of the best birding spots across Land Between The Lakes.

American Bald Eagle (Land Between the Lakes)

American Bald Eagle (Land Between the Lakes)

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LBL to host Public Meetings to Discuss Road System

 

Land Between the Lakes - LBLGolden Pond, KY – Land Between The Lakes (LBL) National Recreation Area will host three informational public meetings to discuss their road system.

Nationally, the USDA Forest Service is required to identify National Forest System roads no longer needed to meet forest resource management objectives. Transportation Analysis Process (TAP) provides a critical first step towards the development of proposed actions towards the future “minimum road system.”

LBL Aerial of North End Canal. (Land Between the Lakes)

LBL Aerial of North End Canal. (Land Between the Lakes)

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Land Between The Lakes Race to the Canal Returns October 21st

 

Land Between the LakesGolden Pond, KY – Race to the Canal will take place again this year at Land Between The Lakes (LBL) National Recreation Area on Sunday, October 21st. This event provides cyclists the opportunity to enjoy an adrenaline rush in the great outdoors!

This mountain bike race is sponsored locally by Wood-N-Wave, Grand Rivers, KY, and sanctioned by USA Cycling (USAC). Race to the Canal is a point-to-point event that will cover challenging and varied terrain along the North/South Trail from Golden Pond Visitor Center to North Welcome Station. Some expert classes will also race the Canal Loop for a total of 42.5 miles. «Read the rest of this article»

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Race to the Canal Returns to Land Between the Lakes

 

Land Between the LakesGolden Pond, KY – Race to the Canal is set to take place again this year at Land Between The Lakes (LBL) National Recreation Area on Sunday, October 30th. This event provides cyclists the opportunity to enjoy an adrenaline rush in the great outdoors!

This mountain bike race is sponsored locally by Wood-N-Wave, Grand Rivers, KY, and sanctioned by USA Cycling (USAC).  Race to the Canal is an endurance event that will cover challenging and varied terrain along the North/South Trail from Golden Pond Visitor Center to North Welcome Station. Some expert classes will also race the Canal Loop for a total of 42.5 miles. «Read the rest of this article»

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