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Topic: literacy

Clarksville Academy’s Literacy Day delighted Students

 

Clarksville AcademyClarksville, TN – Sally Allen of Clarksville Academy recently invited a few lucky individuals to stop by for the school’s annual Literacy Day.

“Each year, we bring a favorite Christmas story to life for our Pre-K – 5th grade students,” Allen said. “This year, we will use the book Frosty the Snowman. Our library will be transformed into the magical world of Frosty, and it’s sure to be a hit with our students.”

This year, Clarksville Academy's Living Literacy Day featured students, teachers and volunteers staging a production of Frosty the Snowman.

This year, Clarksville Academy’s Living Literacy Day featured students, teachers and volunteers staging a production of Frosty the Snowman.

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American Heart Association says Limited Health Literacy is a major barrier to Heart Disease Prevention and Treatment

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Limited healthy literacy is a major barrier blocking many people from achieving good cardiovascular health or benefiting from effective treatment for heart attacks, heart failure, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

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There are three keys to improving literacy of Tennessee children

 

educationClarksville, TN – The absolute essential for success in school and in life is the ability to read. Literacy is no longer a luxury; it’s a necessity.

In Tennessee, currently one-fifth (twenty per cent) of adults do not have a high school diploma. I suspect that many of these people also have difficulty reading, whether from a learning disability or from not being able to attend school on a regular basis.

How can we prevent this problem? I think the following three changes could make a huge difference in the lives of our children and their success rate. «Read the rest of this article»

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Clarksville Montgomery County Adult Literacy Council and the LEAP Organization collaborate to open Community Learning Resource Center

 

LEAP OrganizationClarksville, TN – The Adult Literacy Council partnered with the Leap Organization to develop a computer lab to aid adults and youth become more computer literate.

“We believe that higher learning in literacy, math, and other basic skills is the key to an individual’s success” commented ALC Executive Director Velma Jo Williams. “The Adult Literacy Council appreciates the LEAP Org., in storing our NetBook Computers in their computer lab and look forward in working together in the fight against illiteracy with the hopes of individuals becoming productive citizens.”

Adult Literacy Council and the Leap Organization have partnered to develop a computer lab for youth and adults.

Adult Literacy Council and the Leap Organization have partnered to develop a computer lab for youth and adults.

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Altra Federal Credit Union makes Award-Winning Financial Literacy Program Free for Local Classrooms

 

Banzai Teaches Students Money Management Through Real-Life Scenarios

Altra Federal Credit UnionClarksville, TN – Altra Federal Credit Union has stepped forward to help local students learn to manage money in a fun, real-world way.

The local credit union has teamed with Banzai, a national award-winning financial literacy program, to make the program available to local teachers and students, completely free. «Read the rest of this article»

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Team Leader Course helps ANA fight illiteracy

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. Spencer Case
304th Public Affairs Detachment

Regional Command East - Combined Joint Task Force - 101Paktya Province, Afghanistan – Afghan National Army 2nd Lt. Mohibullah keeps a note scrawled in Pashto of “pretty good” handwriting tacked to his office wall. It reads: “Until the headmaster returns, I have complete responsibility.”

The soldier who wrote the note had, a few days earlier, been completely illiterate.

Mohibullah, the new commander of the Team Leader Course, who like many Afghans goes by only one name, keeps the note as a reminder of what can happen when uneducated soldiers are given an opportunity to learn.

The four-week Team Leader Course is unique among the three noncommissioned officer training courses at Forward Operating Base Thunder in Paktya Province under the auspices of the ANA’s 203rd Thunder Corps. Unlike the Battle Course, the Team Leader Course is not designed for ANA soldiers who have experience as NCOs, and unlike the 1U Course, it does not assume the students have had any prior education. 

Afghan National Army soldiers Mohammed Qasim and Seenatullah, both natives of Takhar Province, study during the literacy block of the Team Leader Course on Forward Operating Base Thunder, Paktya Province, Oct.  17th. The first week of the Team Leader Course is dedicated to literacy and basic education, a first opportunity for many ANA soldiers. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Spencer Case, 304th Public Affairs Detachment)

Afghan National Army soldiers Mohammed Qasim and Seenatullah, both natives of Takhar Province, study during the literacy block of the Team Leader Course on Forward Operating Base Thunder, Paktya Province, Oct. 17th. The first week of the Team Leader Course is dedicated to literacy and basic education, a first opportunity for many ANA soldiers. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Spencer Case, 304th Public Affairs Detachment)

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Three keys to improving the literacy of Tennessee children

 

educationThe absolute essential for success in school and in life is the ability to read. Literacy is no longer a luxury; it’s a necessity.

In Tennessee, currently one-fifth (twenty per cent) of adults do not have a high school diploma. I suspect that many of these people also have difficulty reading, whether from a learning disability or from not being able to attend school on a regular basis.

How can we prevent this problem? I think the following three changes could make a huge difference in the lives of our children and their success rate. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Education | No Comments
 


Finding the world in the pages of a book

 

In celebration of Banned Books Week, Clarksville Online will offer our readers articles, and Best Books lists — yes, lists — of the best in literature for both adults and children.  Have you read a banned Book? We hope so!

Becca and Rochelle await the midnight hour and the last Harry Potter book

Some time ago, three generations of my family, myself included, some of us costumed to honor favored characters, stormed the bookstores for the midnight release of the final Harry Potter novel, Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows. My granddaughter, in her Harry Potter Sorting Hat, and a friend stood guard at the shop’s storeroom door hoping for glimpse of,  … Oh my! Can it be? A book! Not a rock star. Not a movie idol. A BOOK.

Granted it was a big book. A special book. It was a book with all the answers to all the questions derived from the first six books in the series. Thus, somewhere around 2 a.m., five copies of the pre-ordered book in our house — everyone wanted “my own” copy, and we could not all read the same book at the same time.

J.K. Rowling, with her first scrawled story, got an entire generation of children to read books. Not read…devour, with an insatiable hunger for more. «Read the rest of this article»

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Children’s book on male penguins raising chick remains on list of most challenged books

 

In celebration of Banned Books Week, Clarksville Online will offer our readers articles, and Best Books lists — yes, lists — of the best in literature for both adults and children.  Have you read a banned Book? We hope so!

Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell’s award-winning “And Tango Makes Three,” a children’s book about two male penguins caring for an orphaned egg, topped the list of American Library Association’s (ALA) 10 Most Challenged Books of 2007. A year ago. This year’s tally of challenges has three more months to go.

Three books are new to the list “Olive’s Ocean,” by Kevin Henkes; “The Golden Compass,” by Philip Pullman; and “TTYL,” by Lauren Myracle.“Free access to information is a core American value that should be protected,” said Judith F. Krug, director of the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom. “Not every book is right for each reader, but an individual’s interpretation of a book should not take away my right to select reading materials for my family or myself.” «Read the rest of this article»

 

YALSA: Best of the year’s books for young adults

 

In celebration of Banned Books Week, Clarksville Online will offer our readers articles, and Best Books lists — yes, lists — of the best in literature for both adults and children.  Have you read a banned Book? We hope so!

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), the fastest-growing division of the American Library Association (ALA), has announced its 2008 list of Best Books for Young Adults. The list of 85 books, drawn from 216 official nominations, is presented annually at the ALA Midwinter Meeting. The books, recommended for those ages 12-18, meet the criteria of both good quality literature and appealing reading for teens.

The list comprises a wide range of genres and styles, including contemporary realistic fiction that reflects the diversity of the teen experience, nonfiction that brings to teens an awareness of the world they live in and its history, and fantastical stories told in both narrative and graphic formats.

In addition, the Best Books for Young Adults Committee created a Top Ten list of titles from the final list that exemplify the quality and range of literature being published for teens. (Starred items denote Top Ten selections.)

“This year’s list demonstrates the variety of outstanding choices to entice and enrich teen readers. There is something here to appeal to every reader, and also to attract teens who don’t regularly read to the pleasures of a good book.” ~~ Holly Koelling, committee chair. «Read the rest of this article»

 



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