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Topic: Mark Burrell

Task Force Bronco assumes battle space from Task Force Bastogne

 

Written by U.S. Staff Sgt. Amber Robinson
Task Force Bronco Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionNangarhar Province, Afghanistan – U.S. Soldiers, Afghan National Security Force soldiers and local Afghan dignitaries gathered to witness the transfer of authority ceremony, in which Task Force Bastogne, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, relinquished their battle space to Task Force Bronco, 3rd BCT, 25th Infantry Division, at Forward Operating Base Fenty, Afghanistan, May 3rd.

Task Force Bastogne, out of Fort Campbell, KY, controlled the Nangarhar, Kunar, Laghman and Nuristan Provinces of Regional Command-East for the last year. Task Force Bronco, out of Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, will assume responsibility of the area for the next year, minus Laghman Province.

U.S. Army Col. Richard C. Kim, commander of Task Force Bronco, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, from Honolulu, and U.S. Army Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew J. Spano, command sergeant major of TF Bronco, 3rd BCT, 25th Inf. Div., from Northboro, MA, unfurl their unit colors during the transfer of authority ceremony at Forward Operating Base Fenty, Afghanistan, May 3rd. (Photo by U.S. Army Spc. Hillary Rustine, Task Force Bronco Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Col. Richard C. Kim, commander of Task Force Bronco, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, from Honolulu, and U.S. Army Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew J. Spano, command sergeant major of TF Bronco, 3rd BCT, 25th Inf. Div., from Northboro, MA, unfurl their unit colors during the transfer of authority ceremony at Forward Operating Base Fenty, Afghanistan, May 3rd. (Photo by U.S. Army Spc. Hillary Rustine, Task Force Bronco Public Affairs)

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Six Task Force No Slack Soldiers remembered

 

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneKunar Province, Afghanistan – Soldiers held a memorial service for six fallen U.S. Soldiers from Task Force No Slack at Forward Operating Base Joyce in eastern Afghanistan April 9th.

The U.S. Army Soldiers, all from 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, died during combat operations in Barawolo Kalay and Sarowbay in Kunar Province’s Marawara District March 29th.

The deceased included: U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Ofren Arrechaga, from Hialeah, FL; Staff Sgt. Frank E. Adamski, from Moosup, CT; Staff Sgt. Bryan A. Burgess, from Cleburne, Texas; Spc. Dustin J. Feldhaus, from Glendale, AZ; Spc. Jameson L. Lindskog, from Pleasanton, CA; and Pfc. Jeremy P. Faulkner, from Griffin, GA.

U.S. Army Spc. Brit B. Jacobs, a combat medic from Sarasota, FL, Task Force No Slack, 101st Airborne Division, gives a farewell kiss to the helmet of one of his fallen comrades during a memorial service for six fallen U.S. Soldiers at Forward Operating Base Joyce in eastern Afghanistan's Kunar Province April 9th. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Spc. Brit B. Jacobs, a combat medic from Sarasota, FL, Task Force No Slack, 101st Airborne Division, gives a farewell kiss to the helmet of one of his fallen comrades during a memorial service for six fallen U.S. Soldiers at Forward Operating Base Joyce in eastern Afghanistan's Kunar Province April 9th. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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Point man steers team clear of danger

 

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneKunar Province, Afghanistan – “I can say that I’ve led this platoon into more ambushes than any other point man here on this deployment,” said U.S. Army Sgt. Nathaniel S. Gray with a toothy grin and slow, southern accent.

“I was point man for the first six, seven months here,” he continued. “I walked us into a lot. I can smell it, but I don’t know where it’s at. I know it’s going to happen. Every time we were walking I was looking for my next covered and concealed position. Ya know, I’d look at this rock, then that rock. Oh, there’s another rock, that’s where I’m going. I just never knew when it was going to happen.”

U.S. Army Sgt. Nathaniel S. Gray, an infantry squad leader from Tupelo, MS, assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, scans the mountainside during a recent combat operation in eastern Afghanistan's Kunar Province March 16th. Gray is on his third combat tour. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Sgt. Nathaniel S. Gray, an infantry squad leader from Tupelo, MS, assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, scans the mountainside during a recent combat operation in eastern Afghanistan's Kunar Province March 16th. Gray is on his third combat tour. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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Taliban disinformation campaign thwarted by ANA and U.S. forces

 

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneKunar Province, Afghanistan – The mountainside of the Shigal Valley in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province came alive, March 16th, with the whirring of helicopters marking the beginning of Operation Eagle Talon.

Afghan National Army soldiers and Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, Task Force No Slack, flooded Shigal District where slabs of rock stretch into the fertile valley floors.

Through a night-vision lens, Task Force No Slack, is silhouetted by the moon while pulling security shortly after being air assaulted to a mountaintop in Shigal Valley in eastern Afghanistan March 16. Multiple companies of Soldiers were dropped in to surround the valley marking the beginning of Operation Eagle Talon. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, 210th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

Through a night-vision lens, Task Force No Slack, is silhouetted by the moon while pulling security shortly after being air assaulted to a mountaintop in Shigal Valley in eastern Afghanistan March 16. Multiple companies of Soldiers were dropped in to surround the valley marking the beginning of Operation Eagle Talon. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, 210th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

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Belgian trucker treks across Afghanistan in U.S. Army

 

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneNangarhar Province, Afghanistan – The hulking mine resistant, ambush-protected all terrain vehicle screamed to a halt. The Soldiers held their breath for what was next.

An explosion? The road was crumbling in places and narrow enough to be an insurgent’s favorite choice.

Machine gun fire? A convoy of vehicles this long made such an opportune target.

A stray puppy? U.S. Army Pvt. Peter Beullens casually turned toward his truck commander with a smile.

During a recent mission, U.S. Army Pvt. Peter Beullens, Task Force Balls, steers his mine resistant, ambush-protected all terrain vehicle onto the hardball while escorting local resupply trucks to Forward Operating Base Garcia in eastern Afghanistan's Nangarhar Province Feb. 25th. Beullens is on his first deployment to Afghanistan. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne)

During a recent mission, U.S. Army Pvt. Peter Beullens, Task Force Balls, steers his mine resistant, ambush-protected all terrain vehicle onto the hardball while escorting local resupply trucks to Forward Operating Base Garcia in eastern Afghanistan's Nangarhar Province Feb. 25th. Beullens is on his first deployment to Afghanistan. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne)

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The Jamaican Grunt

 

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneKunar Province, Afghanistan – U.S. Army Staff Sgt. McCarthy Phillip, an infantry squad leader from Decatur, GA, assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, Task Force Bulldog, explains how he joined the Army after living in Jamaica for most of his life from Forward Operating Base Blessing in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province.

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Bastogne Overwatch

 

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionNuristan Province, Afghanistan – Soldiers from Cougar Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, set up an over watch position in Taliban territory in eastern Afghanistan’s Nuristan Province.

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Combat Medic in Afghanistan

 

Video by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell
210th MPAD

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionNuristan Province, Afghanistan – A day in the life of U.S. Army Spc. Brit ‘Doc’ B. Jacobs from Sarasota, FL, assigned to Company C, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, doing his job as a combat medic in eastern Afghanistan’s Nuristan Province while under enemy fire.

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Brotherhood at the top of Afghanistan

 

Written by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionKunar Province, Afghanistan – At the highest observation post in northeastern, a brotherhood of U.S. Army Soldiers protects a small valley that feeds into the Kunar River Valley.

Surrounded by snow-capped mountains and freezing winds a few kilometers from the Pakistan border, Observation Post Mustang weathers storms and waves of Taliban fighters.

Soldiers from Troop C, 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, Task Force Bandit, of the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, stay vigilant day and night at the small, outpost located in the Hindu Kush Mountains mountains 6,500 feet above Kunar Province.

From a remote observation post high up in the Hindu Kush Mountains on the border of Pakistan, U.S. Army Sgt. Matthew B. Sorrell stands guard overlooking “Rocket Ridge” at Observation Post Mustang in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Jan. 25th. The Soldiers named the ridge Rocket Ridge because the Taliban use it to fire rockets at them before they suppressed the area. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

From a remote observation post high up in the Hindu Kush Mountains on the border of Pakistan, U.S. Army Sgt. Matthew B. Sorrell stands guard overlooking “Rocket Ridge” at Observation Post Mustang in eastern Afghanistan’s Kunar Province Jan. 25th. The Soldiers named the ridge Rocket Ridge because the Taliban use it to fire rockets at them before they suppressed the area. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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Southern Soldier reflects on God, family, country

 

Written by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell
Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBastogneNangarhar Province, Afghanistan – God. Family. Country. In that order. The only colors are a red and blue American flag draped over a black-inked cross with those three words: God. Family. Country.

U.S. Army Pfc. Gregory K. Martin, a fire control direction specialist from Pleasant Grove, AL, wears this tattoo on his forearm proudly. For him, it’s a symbol for the three most important things in his life.

At Forward Operating Base Connolly in eastern Afghanistan’s Nangarhar Province, U.S. Army Pfc. Gregory K. Martin, Task Force Panther, displays his tattoo Dec. 22nd, representing the three most important things in his life: God, family and country. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

At Forward Operating Base Connolly in eastern Afghanistan’s Nangarhar Province, U.S. Army Pfc. Gregory K. Martin, Task Force Panther, displays his tattoo Dec. 22nd, representing the three most important things in his life: God, family and country. (Photo by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, Task Force Bastogne Public Affairs)

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