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Topic: Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicles

No Slack soldiers certify to drive to survive

 

Written by Sgt. Richard Daniels Jr.
1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

BastogneFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division

Afghanistan – It’s no secret that the roads in Afghanistan and Iraq are some of the most dangerous in the world, but No Slack soldiers train to drive their tactical vehicles in preparation November 17th, outside their battalion here.

Nearly 20 soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, finished their drivers’ certification this week on the Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement and the MaxxPro Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles.

Second Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, assists in backing up a Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle Nov. 17th, outside their battalion here. (Photo by Sgt. Richard Daniels Jr.)

Second Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, assists in backing up a Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle Nov. 17th, outside their battalion here. (Photo by Sgt. Richard Daniels Jr.)

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‘Mired’ in training

 

Written by Cpl. Sarah Keegan
101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

101st Sustainment Brigade - LifelinersFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBagram Airfield, Afghanistan – Exactly how many lieutenants does it take to recover a wrecked vehicle mired in the mud?

More than 20 junior officers with the 101st Sustainment Brigade got the chance to answer that question as they waded through the muddy pit to extract a wrecked Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle during vehicle recovery training.

The training, part of the brigade’s monthly Leadership Professional Development course, is intended to get the officers familiar with recovery procedures that soldiers face regularly as they conduct real world operations in a combat environment.

First Lt. Krystal Hertenstein, a platoon leader for the 584th Maintenance Company, 142nd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 101st Sustainment Brigade, helps rig a snatchbox to recover a MAX-Pro vehicle from a mire pit during the brigade's Leadership Professional Development course. (Photo by Spc. Michael Vanpool)

First Lt. Krystal Hertenstein, a platoon leader for the 584th Maintenance Company, 142nd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 101st Sustainment Brigade, helps rig a snatchbox to recover a MAX-Pro vehicle from a mire pit during the brigade's Leadership Professional Development course. (Photo by Spc. Michael Vanpool)

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Schoolhouse instructors train lifeliners on vehicle recovery

 

Written by Spc. Michael Vanpool
101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

101st Sustainment Brigade - LifelinersFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionBagram Airfield, Afghanistan – A deployment calls for a different skill set than the garrison Army life as many soldiers expand their knowledge with on the job training.

Those soldiers have formal classroom training and the same program as the schoolhouse. The only difference, instead of traveling to the school, the classroom came to them.

Instructors from the US Army Ordnance Center and School recently deployed to Afghanistan to train Soldiers outside the schoolhouse, including a Vehicle Recovery Course for soldiers of the 101st Sustainment Brigade.

Spc. Larry Smith, a mechanic with the 131st Transportation Company, a Pennsylvania National Guard unit attached to the 101st Sustainment Brigade, and Sgt. 1st Class Alvin Beehler, the chief instructor for the vehicle recovery course from the 59th Ordnance Brigade, US Army Ordnance Center and School, flip a mine resistant ambush-protected vehicle with an M984 HEMTT wrecker. (Photo by Spc. Michael Vanpool)

Spc. Larry Smith, a mechanic with the 131st Transportation Company, a Pennsylvania National Guard unit attached to the 101st Sustainment Brigade, and Sgt. 1st Class Alvin Beehler, the chief instructor for the vehicle recovery course from the 59th Ordnance Brigade, US Army Ordnance Center and School, flip a mine resistant ambush-protected vehicle with an M984 HEMTT wrecker. (Photo by Spc. Michael Vanpool)

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U.S. military receives new recovery vehicle

 

Written by U.S. Army Sgt. Scott Davis
Combined Joint Task Force-101 Public Affairs

Regional Command East - Combined Joint Task Force - 101Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan – The M1249 military recovery vehicle made its debut at Bagram Airfield March 14th. This new vehicle will provide the U.S. military with the ability to recover any vehicle no matter the damage.

Representatives from the U.S. military sent a request out to any company willing to build a vehicle that could recover all military vehicles currently used including the Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicles, some of the heaviest vehicles used by the military. Navistar took the lead on the creation of the MRV.

The M1249 military recovery vehicle is on display during its debut at Bagram Airfield March 14th. The U.S. military has ordered 250 of these wreckers to replace the current wrecker in Afghanistan. The MRV has the ability to recover any military vehicle that is damaged or stuck, including the Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicles, which are some of the heaviest vehicles currently used. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Scott Davis, Combined Joint Task Force-101 Public Affairs)

The M1249 military recovery vehicle is on display during its debut at Bagram Airfield March 14th. The U.S. military has ordered 250 of these wreckers to replace the current wrecker in Afghanistan. The MRV has the ability to recover any military vehicle that is damaged or stuck, including the Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicles, which are some of the heaviest vehicles currently used. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Scott Davis, Combined Joint Task Force-101 Public Affairs)

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The defense of COP Margah: A Story of Valor

 

Soldiers Recount Details of Thwarted Complex Attack
  
Written by U.S. Army Spc. Luther L. Boothe Jr.
Task Force Currahee Public Affairs

CurraheeFort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne DivisionPaktika Province, Afghanistan — The Soldiers tasked as the first line of defense for Combat Outpost Margah in Paktika Province were on alert due to reports of a potential attack. The six Soldiers at the observation point were ready, but nobody expected an attack of the magnitude they got.

Clouds filled the sky making that night darker than usual. U.S. Army Soldiers from Company C, 2nd Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, successfully defended COP Margah from a complex attack against more than 120 insurgents during the early morning hours of October 30th.

U.S. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus International Security Assistance Force commander, shakes the hand of U.S. Army Spc. Timothy James of Gilbert, AZ, after pinning him with a Bronze Star Medal with Valor at Combat Outpost Margah Nov. 11th. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Hector Santos, Task Force Currahee)

U.S. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus International Security Assistance Force commander, shakes the hand of U.S. Army Spc. Timothy James of Gilbert, AZ, after pinning him with a Bronze Star Medal with Valor at Combat Outpost Margah Nov. 11th. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Hector Santos, Task Force Currahee)

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Iron Rakkasans conduct successful resupply despite insurgent attacks

 

Written by U.S. Army 1st Lt. R. J. Peek Company D, 3rd Battalion, 172nd Infantry Regiment

Fort Campbell KY, 101st Airborne Division Patch187th Infantry Regiment - Iron RakkasansPaktika Province, Afghanistan – In an effort to better prepare incoming 4th Brigade, 101st Airborne Division Soldiers, the Iron Rakkasans from 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment conducted July 23rd-25th the second largest resupply of vehicles and equipment since the unit has been in country.

In order to achieve success, the monumental operation focused on accomplishing two tasks: getting supplies and equipment to their destination, and bringing supplies and equipment back.

“The first task was to bring fuel, food, vehicles and repair parts to Forward Operating Base Khoyr Kot Castle and FOB Kushamond,” said U.S. Army 1st Lt. Joshua Canan, a native of Greenville, OH, and battalion motor officer for the forward support company that works with 3 Bn., 187th Inf. “Four additional Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicles were taken down to ensure that the incoming unit would be fully mission capable when they get ready to take over western Paktika.”

Task Force Iron Soldiers drive through an Afghan village during a recent convoy of vehicles and equipment.  The convoy was the largest resupply the unit has conducted since arriving in February.  Despite encountering five IEDs and being fired upon by insurgents, the mission was a success and no injuries were sustained. (Official U.S. Army Photo)

Task Force Iron Soldiers drive through an Afghan village during a recent convoy of vehicles and equipment. The convoy was the largest resupply the unit has conducted since arriving in February. Despite encountering five IEDs and being fired upon by insurgents, the mission was a success and no injuries were sustained. (Official U.S. Army Photo)

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