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American Heart Association says Black teens from Great Recession may have higher risk factors for Heart Disease, Diabetes

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African-American teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers studied 328 African-Americans who had experienced the Great Recession of 2007-2009 as 16- and 17-year-olds living in nine rural counties in Georgia with high poverty rates and high rates of death from cardiovascular disease.

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

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Austin Peay State University music double major Garrett Coscolluela a part of world championship-winning drum corps

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – For the past four years, Austin Peay State University senior music education and music performance double major Garrett Coscolluela has spent one weekend in August marching on the field of Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana.

But it wasn’t until this past August — in his final trip to the home of the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts — that Coscolluela had the hardware to prove he was among the best in what’s considered the major leagues of marching band performance.

APSU's Garrett Coscolluela

APSU’s Garrett Coscolluela

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American Heart Association says the Taller you are, the more likely you may be to develop Blood Clots in Veins

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The taller you are, the more likely you may be to develop blood clots in the veins, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

In a study of more than two million Swedish siblings, researchers found that the risk of venous thromboembolism – a type of blood clot that starts in a vein – was associated with height, with the lowest risk being in shorter participants.

Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter. (American Heart Association)

Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Elected Officials must ‘rise to the challenge’ to see declines in Obesity

 

Comments from Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO, on the State of Obesity report released by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – This year’s State of Obesity report from Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is the latest evidence that adult obesity rates in the U.S. have steadied in recent years. After decades of sharp increases, this counts as a significant achievement.

But with rates still far too high among both adults and kids, particularly among low-income and minority communities, leaders at all levels of government – local, state, and federal – must take action and build on this progress.

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

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Young adults, especially men, fall behind in high blood pressure treatment and control

 

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults, particularly men, lag behind middle-aged and older adults in awareness and treatment of high blood pressure, putting this population at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke and is also a significant public health burden, costing the United States about $110 billion in direct and indirect costs in 2015, according to American Heart Association estimates.

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Brain Activity may be predictor of Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The brain may have a distinctive activity pattern during stressful events that predicts bodily reactions, such as rises in blood pressure that increase risk for cardiovascular disease, according to new proof-of-concept research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The new research, the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might influence a person’s heart health.   

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Low-Income Patients more likely to take Blood Pressure Medication when Doctor involves them in conversation

 

Circulation: Quality and Outcomes Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The key to getting low-income patients to take their blood pressure medications as prescribed may be as simple as a conversation.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure were less likely to take their medications as directed when their healthcare providers did not use a collaborative communication style or ask them about social issues such as employment, housing and partner relationships, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Air pollution linked to Cardiovascular Disease; Air Purifiers may lessen impact

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exposure to high levels of air pollution increased stress hormone levels and negative metabolic changes in otherwise healthy, young adults in a recent study conducted in China. Air purifiers appeared to lessen the negative effects, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers focused on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking – because many studies have suggested this type of major air pollutant might lead to cardiovascular and metabolic health consequences, according to Haidong Kan, M.D., Ph.D., study author and professor of environmental health sciences at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

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American Heart Association says Disadvantaged Kids may be at higher risk for Heart Disease later in life

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in adults may indicate higher risk for heart attack and stroke in later life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The carotid arteries supply blood to the brain. An ultrasound test of the arteries’ inner layers, the intima and media, may detect the early development of atherosclerosis, or “hardening of the arteries,” which underlies the development of cardiovascular disease later in life.

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Fluctuations in home-monitored Blood Pressure may raise Dementia risk

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Whether or not you have high blood pressure, your risk of dementia may be higher if your pressure varies a lot from day to day, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Home monitoring of blood pressure may be useful to assess the future risk of dementia,” said lead study author Tomoyuki Ohara, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuropsychiatry at the Graduate School of Medical Sciences at Kyushu University in Fukuoka City, Japan.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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