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American Heart Association reports More Cardiac Arrest Victims could Survive with Dispatcher CPR Instruction, Rescue Breaths for Children

 

American Heart Association Moves to Annual Guidelines Update, a First for the Organization

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More people will survive cardiac arrest if emergency medical dispatchers give chest compression-only CPR instructions over the phone and if infants and children receive chest compressions with rescue breaths, according to updated CPR guidelines published today by the American Heart Association (Association), the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease.

The changes in the 2017 American Heart Association Focused Updates on Adult and Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality also re-emphasize the importance of bystanders starting immediate chest compressions if they see an adult collapse in a suspected cardiac arrest.

Man administers CPR to child in reenactment illustrating proper technique. (American Heart Association)

Man administers CPR to child in reenactment illustrating proper technique. (American Heart Association)

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More Physical Activity and Higher Intensity Physical Activity may significantly reduce Risk of Death in Older Women in the short term

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More physical activity and at higher intensities could lead to a big drop in the risk of death in older women from any cause, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers found the volume of light intensity physical activity or sedentary behavior was not associated with death rate. However, light intensity activity may be beneficial for other health outcomes not studied in this research.

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

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APSU Student Newspaper The All State receives eight National Awards at Dallas Conference

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – The All State, Austin Peay State University’s student newspaper, earned eight national awards at the 2017 Fall National College Media Convention in Dallas, Texas, on Saturday, October 28th, 2017.

The conference was presented by the Associated Collegiate Press and the College Media Association.

Austin Peay State University’s student newspaper The All State comes away with eight National Awards from 2017 Fall National College Media Convention held in Dallas, Texas.

Austin Peay State University’s student newspaper The All State comes away with eight National Awards from 2017 Fall National College Media Convention held in Dallas, Texas.

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American Heart Association says Teen Childbirth linked to increased risk for Heart Disease

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXWomen who became first-time mothers as teens were significantly more likely than older mothers to have greater risks for heart and blood vessel disease later in life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers found that women reporting a first birth before the age of 20 scored significantly higher on Framingham Risk Score — a measure commonly used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk.

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association provides Five Tips to Eat Smart during the Holidays

 

The American Heart Association’s Healthy For Good™ and Fresh Avocados – Love One Today® help Americans stay on track this festive season

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Seasonal sweet treats and multi-course meals tempt even the most dedicated healthy eaters during the holidays. That’s why the American Heart Association is designating November as Eat Smart Month.

Kicking off with Eat Smart Day on November 1st, the month-long campaign is part of the Association’s new Healthy For Good movement, supported by National Recipe Host Fresh Avocados – Love One Today®. As part of the campaign, the Association will provide nutrition tips and healthy recipes throughout the month.

Slow-cooker panang curry with chicken cauliflower rice. (American Heart Association)

Slow-cooker panang curry with chicken cauliflower rice. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Higher Thyroid Hormone Levels associated with Artery Disease and Death

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – High and high-normal levels of a thyroid hormone called FT4, were associated with artery disease and death in elderly and middle-aged people, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

Researchers analyzed data from 9,420 participants (average age 65, 57 percent women) in the Rotterdam Study looking at data on two types of hormones: thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine (known as FT4) and their link to atherosclerosis and death due to coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease or other artery-related illness.

High and high-normal levels of a thyroid hormone called free thyroxine or FT4, were associated with artery disease and death in elderly and middle-aged people. (American Heart Association)

High and high-normal levels of a thyroid hormone called free thyroxine or FT4, were associated with artery disease and death in elderly and middle-aged people. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Less than half of Patients prescribed new Cholesterol Drug receive Insurance Approval

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Less than half of patients received their insurer’s approval for prescriptions of PCSK9 inhibitors, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

PCSK9 inhibitors, like Repatha (evolocumab) and Praluent (alirocumab), work by increasing the removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol from the blood. They have been shown to reduce LDL by 60 percent and decrease major cardiac events but cost much more than other cholesterol-lowering drugs with an average cost of $14,300 per year. Prescriptions require prior authorization by health insurance companies.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Men develop Irregular Heartbeat earlier than Women

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Men develop a type of irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation, about a decade earlier than women on average, and being overweight is a major risk factor, according to a large new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, quiver instead of beat to move blood effectively.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

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CDC reports Adult and Teen Obesity Rates hit all-time high

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate the adult obesity rates in the United States are now a staggering 40 percent while youth obesity rates grew to 20 percent for 12-to-19-year-olds.

An all-time high, these rates and the persistent disparities across different race-ethnicity groups further elevate public health concerns about how our nation can prevent and reduce obesity.

American Heart Association calls for transformative change to reverse trends in obesity. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association calls for transformative change to reverse trends in obesity. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Tai Chi holds promise as Cardiac Rehab Exercise

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation, according to preliminary research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

After a heart attack, more than 60 percent of patients decline participation in cardiac rehabilitation.

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

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