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American Heart Association says Older Adults with Heart Disease can become more independent and Heart Healthy with Physical Activity

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Improving physical activity among older adults with heart disease benefits their heart health, independence and quality of life, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Physical activity helps reduce heart disease symptoms for patients with heart failure, heart attacks and stroke, and it also helps to improve the age-related erosions of strength, balance, and reduces frailty that particularly affect older heart patients.

Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (American Heart Association)

Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Coffee shops, ATMs may be ideal locations for lifesaving AEDs

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Community coffee shops and automated teller machines, or ATMs, might be ideal locations for public access to automated external defibrillators (AEDs), according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device that can check a person’s heart rhythm and recognize a rhythm that requires a shock and advise the rescuer when a shock is needed.

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an "ELECTRICAL" problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

CARDIAC ARREST occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an “ELECTRICAL” problem. A HEART ATTACK occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “CIRCULATION” problem. A blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Fish Oil Supplements may help prevent death after a Heart Attack but lack evidence of cardiovascular benefit for the general population

 

American Heart Association Science Advisory

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may help prevent death from heart disease in patients who recently had a heart attack and may prevent death and hospitalizations in patients with heart failure, but there is a lack of scientific research to support clinical use of these supplements to prevent heart disease in the general population, according to a new science advisory from the American Heart Association.

“We cannot make a recommendation to use omega-3 fish oil supplements for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease at this time,” said David Siscovick, M.D., M.P.H., chair of the writing committee of the new science advisory published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may be reasonable for patients who have had a heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Omega-3 fish oil supplements prescribed by a healthcare provider may be reasonable for patients who have had a heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Pacemaker function may be impacted by Electric Appliances; Tools

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Electromagnetic interferences with pacemakers in everyday life can occur, however, harmful interferences are rare using vendors’ recommended device settings,” said Andreas Napp, M.D., study author and cardiologist at RWTH Aachen University Hospital in Aachen, Germany. “Dedicated device programming is an effective measure to reduce the individual risk of interference. For example, doctors can reprogram pacemakers to a lower sensitivity to reduce EMF susceptibility.” 

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats. (American Heart Association)

Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients’ heartbeats. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Caregivers of Black Stroke Survivors spend more time; but report more positive outlook

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Despite providing more hours of care, caregivers of black stroke survivors reported a more positive perception of caregiving than caregivers of white stroke survivors, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study found black stroke survivors received an average of 11 more hours of care than white stroke survivors. There was little difference in the unmet needs of the black and white stroke survivors.

Black stroke survivors were more likely to have a caregiver and received more hours of help per week. (American Heart Association)

Black stroke survivors were more likely to have a caregiver and received more hours of help per week. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Women with Mild Heart Blockage report Poorer Health, more Anxiety and Negativity than Men

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with mild blockage of coronary arteries report poorer health, more anxiety and a more negative outlook than men with the same condition, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

In general, people with non-obstructive coronary artery disease report more anxiety, depression and a negative outlook, what physicians refer to as psychosocial distress, than the general population. Prior to this study, gender disparity had not been investigated.

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Kids with heart defects face Learning Challenges, Inadequate School Support

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children with all types of congenital heart defects face learning challenges in elementary school, but many may not be receiving adequate education assistance, according to a new study in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Using North Carolina education records, birth defect registries and birth certificates, the new research examined whether congenital heart defects were associated with low scores on standard reading and math tests given at the end of third grade. The research included 2,807 children born with heart defects, and 6,355 without, who completed third grade in public school between 2006 to 2012.

Children with congenital heart defects are less likely to meet minimum standards in third-grade reading and math end-of-year testing than peers. (American Heart Association)

Children with congenital heart defects are less likely to meet minimum standards in third-grade reading and math end-of-year testing than peers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Long-Term Heavy Drinking may Age Arteries over time

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Drinking too much, can affect the elasticity of the arterial walls (arterial stiffness) and prematurely age the arteries, interfering with blood flow.

Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers. (American Heart Association)

Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Shock from Heart Device often triggers further Health Care needs

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A shock from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may trigger an increase in health care needs for many people, regardless whether the shock was medically necessary, according to a new study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

ICDs save people from sudden cardiac death by delivering a shock to restore a normal rhythm when the lower chambers of their heart, or ventricles, beat erratically.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil may boost ‘good’ cholesterol

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil may enhance the cardioprotective benefits of high-density lipoproteins (HDL—the “good” cholesterol) compared to other diets, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

High levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL—the “bad cholesterol”) and triglycerides, a type of blood fat, are associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases. HDL cholesterol is associated with a lower risk because these lipoproteins help eliminate the excess cholesterol from the bloodstream.

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet - whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

Assorted foods for the Mediterranean Diet – whole grains, olives, olive oil, vegetables, nuts. (American Heart Association)

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