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Smoking may increase kidney disease risk in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXCigarette smoking is considered a universal health hazard, but it may be particularly damaging to kidney function among African-Americans smokers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Cardiovascular and kidney diseases are closely linked, but few people are aware of the impact of smoking on kidney function,” said Michael Hall, M.D., study lead author and an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

Cigarette smoking may be damaging to kidney function in African-Americans.

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American Heart Association Comment strongly refutes study findings on sodium consumption

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association strongly refutes the findings of a May 20th, 2016 article in The Lancet by Mente, et al, that suggest low sodium intake is related to a higher risk of heart disease and death.

On the contrary, the link between excessive sodium and high blood pressure – as well as higher risks of heart disease, stroke, heart failure and kidney disease – is indisputable. Lowering sodium is more important than ever.

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Reduction in Salt Consumption Recommended. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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Around-the-clock monitoring may unmask hypertension in African-Americans according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Wearing an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device that measures blood pressure around-the-clock may help identify African Americans who have masked or undetected high blood pressure outside of the doctor’s office, a tricky condition that can signal high blood pressure in the clinic down the road, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

The reverse of white coat hypertension (higher blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office than at home), masked hypertension is normal blood pressure in the doctor’s office but high readings outside of the office. Masked hypertension is easy to miss, and can occur during the day or night.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports nearly half of all Heart Attacks may be ‘Silent’

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly half of all heart attacks may be silent and like those that cause chest pain or other warning signs, silent heart attacks increase the risk of dying from heart disease and other causes, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A heart attack does not always have classic symptoms, such as pain in your chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats. In fact, a heart attack can occur without symptoms and it is called a silent heart attack (blood flow to the heart muscle is severely reduced or cut off completely).

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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U.S. stroke hospitalizations drop overall, but increase for young people and African-Americans

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nationwide, fewer people overall are being hospitalized for ischemic strokes, which are caused by artery blockages, but among young people and African-Americans, stroke hospitalizations are rising, according to new observational research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Between 2000 and 2010, the number of adults admitted to US hospitals with ischemic stroke fell 18.4 percent, according to researchers who analyzed a national database which collects information on about 8 million hospital stays each year. Ischemic strokes are the most common type of stroke.

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Blood Pressure over time may better predict Stroke, Death Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Knowing the path of a person’s blood pressure from middle age onward may help doctors better assess the health risks posed by high blood pressure and could lead to earlier interventions to prevent stroke and other diseases linked to high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

“We already know that high blood pressure is the biggest risk factor for stroke and that in people aged 50 to 75, it can change in a couple years’ time,” said M. Arfan Ikram, M.D., Ph.D, senior study author and associate professor of neuroepidemiology at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association lists Five fast things you should know about Stroke

 

May is Stroke Month

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – You don’t need superpowers to be a hero when it comes to stroke, you just need to pay attention to the risk factors and know the warning signs.

“Stroke is largely preventable and treatable,” said Mary Ann Bauman, M.D., chair of the American Stroke Association Advisory Committee. “The best way to beat a stroke is to never have one – about 80 percent of strokes are preventable. The second best way to beat a stroke is to identify one immediately when it occurs and call 911.”

For American Stroke Month this May, the American Stroke Association’s Together to End Stroke™ initiative, nationally sponsored by Medtronic, offers five things everyone should know to be a Stroke Hero.

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American Heart Association reports Healthy Diet may reduce High Blood Pressure risk in Pregnancy-Related Diabetes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with pregnancy-related diabetes  (gestational diabetes) are at greater risk of developing high blood pressure later in life; however, a healthy diet may significantly reduce that risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Researchers studied 3,818 women with a history of pregnancy-related diabetes enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II as a part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women’s Health Study. Over 22 years of follow-up, 1,069 women developed high blood pressure, which in turn increased their risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

A healthy diet may reduce the risk that women with pregnancy-related diabetes will develop high blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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APSU Football’s Adam Noble, Evan Toby recognized by NFF Hampshire Society Honors

 

APSU Sports Information

APSU Football - Austin Peay State UniversityDallas, TX – Two Austin Peay State University (APSU) football players are part of the 2016 National Football Foundation & College Football Hall of Fame (NFF) Hampshire Honor Society, recognizing college football players from all divisions who maintain a 3.2 GPA or better.

Linebacker Adam Noble and punter Evan Toby were among the record 868 players honored as the Society celebrates its 10th year.

Adam Noble, Evan Toby recognized by NFF Hampshire Society Honors. (APSU Sports Information) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Healthcare Workers’ Radiation Exposure tied to range of Health Problems

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Healthcare professionals performing x-ray guided cardiovascular procedures may be at higher risk for health problems including orthopedic problems, cataracts, skin lesions and cancers, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions.

The study identified potential radiation-related health risks to professionals that perform common cardiovascular procedures using fluoroscopy — an imaging technique that uses X-rays to obtain real-time moving images of the heart.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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