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Topic: NIH

NIH Makes Additional Investment in Roy Blunt, Lamar Alexander’s Shark-Tank Style Initiative to Expand COVID-19 Testing Capacity

 

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (Mo.), Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies, and U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (Tenn.), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, today welcomed the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) announcement that it has awarded a third round of contracts to six additional companies developing coronavirus diagnostic tests through the Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative.

Blunt and Alexander created the RADx initiative to speed up the development of quick, accurate, and affordable coronavirus tests.

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

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Lamar Alexander says National Institutes of Health “Shark Tank” is Doing in Months What Usually Takes Three to Seven Years

 

U.S. SenateMaryville, TN – Senate health committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) said the “Shark Tank” initiative at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is “doing in months what usually takes three to seven years,” after the NIH announced funding for seven new COVID-19 Coronavirus diagnostic testing methods.

“Tens of millions of new diagnostic tests with quick results are key to containing the virus and building confidence to go back to school, back to work and out to eat,” Senator Alexander said. “This is the surest path toward normalcy until we have a vaccine.”

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

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Senator Lamar Alexander says Vanderbilt’s Dr. Josh Denny to Lead NIH Precision Medicine Initiative

 

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – United States Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) today released the following statement after Dr. Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), announced Vanderbilt’s Dr. Josh Denny will serve as the new chief executive officer for the All of Us Research Program, the centerpiece of the Precision Medicine Initiative:

“Dr. Josh Denny is an experienced team leader and has precisely the skills needed to finish the important job of collecting health information from 1 million people and using that information in a way that saves lives.”

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

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American Heart Association says National Institutes of Health funding dwindles for Cardiac Arrest Research

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to conduct cardiac arrest research has dwindled in the last decade and is a fraction of what the government spends to study other leading causes of death, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Study authors cite Institute of Medicine statistics that suggest cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than 450,000 lives each year.

NIH Research Funding Graphic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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Heart Disease Research Should be a Key Priority, Says American Heart Association

 

Senate Labor HHS Bill Funding Does Not Measure Up to Disease

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – The American Heart Association said today that the Senate FY 2017 funding bill for Labor, HHS and Education is a win for the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH), but unfortunately, does not make heart disease research a priority. The bill includes a welcome six percent bump to the NIH budget: $2 billion over current funding.

However, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) received just a 4.1 percent increase. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke was boosted by 6.3 percent – the amount the association requested – and an additional $100 million was invested in the BRAIN Initiative.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health says Saturday, April 9th is Alcohol Screening Day in Tennessee

 

Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse ServicesNashville, TN – Many Tennesseans enjoy an adult beverage from time to time as a way to unwind and relax. But when that occasional drink or substance use becomes more and more frequent, it can be cause for concern.

In recognition of National Alcohol Screening Day April 9th, the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services is encouraging all Tennesseans to take a short online assessment to determine if their alcohol use is leading to abuse.

Alcohol Awareness Month «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Sugar-Sweetened Drinks linked to increased Visceral Fat

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Data from the Framingham Heart Study — federally supported, ongoing research that has advanced the understanding of cardiovascular disease — showed that among middle-aged adults, there was a direct correlation between greater sweetened beverage consumption and increased visceral fat.

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.. (American Heart Association)

Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk.. (American Heart Association)

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Impact of March 1st Sequester Cuts on Middle Class Families, Jobs and Economic Security on Tennessee

 

The White HouseWashington, D.C. – Unless Congress acts by March 1st, a series of automatic cuts—called the sequester—will take effect that threaten hundreds of thousands of middle class jobs, and cut vital services for children, seniors, people with mental illness and our men and women in uniform.

There is no question that we need to cut the deficit, but the President believes it should be done in a balanced way that protects investments that the middle class relies on. Already, the President has worked with Congress to reduce the deficit by more than $2.5 trillion, but there’s more to do. «Read the rest of this article»

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Weight loss and increased fitness slow decline of mobility in adults

 

NIH-funded research could lead to lower health care costs for adults with type 2 diabetes

National Institutes of Health LogoWashington, D.C. – Weight loss and increased physical fitness nearly halved the risk of losing mobility in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes, according to four-year results from the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. The results are published in the March 29, 2012, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Being able to perform routine activities is an important contributor to quality of life,” said Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D., director of the NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), which led the study. “These findings add support to making lifestyle changes that improve health and reduce disability in people with type 2 diabetes, changes that already have been shown to prevent the disease and provide a good return on investment.”

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Immune cell plays dual role in allergic skin disease

 

NIH-funded study in mice enhances understanding of atopic dermatitis

National Institutes of HealthWashington, D.C. – An immune cell involved in initiating the symptoms of an allergic skin reaction may play an equally, or perhaps more important, role in suppressing the reaction once it becomes chronic.

This finding in mice could have future implications for the treatment of atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects an estimated 10 to 20 percent of infants and young children. The research is by investigators at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the National Institutes of Health. «Read the rest of this article»

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