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Fort Campbell’s 716th MP Soldiers partner with local law enforcement agencies to conduct active-shooter training

 

Written by Spc. Joseph Green
101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – Soldiers with the 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Airborne Division Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), along with other law enforcement officers from numerous other military units and agencies attended the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Training train the trainer active shooter course at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, October 12th-16th, 2015.

Agencies involved included the 101st Division Provost Marshal’s Office, 502nd MP Bn., 198th MP Bn. National Guard, Fort Campbell Police Department, Clarksville Police Department, Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, Kentucky State Police, Tennessee Highway Patrol, Tennessee Wildlife Law Enforcement and personnel with the Kentucky and Tennessee FBI offices.

Shelby Nelson, a law enforcement officer with the Clarksville Police Department; Staff Sgt. Mathew Lange, a military police officer with the 194th Military Police Company, 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Airborne Division Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault); Sgt. John Michl, with the 551st MP Co., 716th MP Bn.; and Jesse Hedrick, a deputy with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, conduct the breaching phase of the approaches and breaching portion of the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Reaction Training train-the-trainer active-shooter course Oct. 14, 2015, at Fort Campbell, KY. (Spc. Joseph Green, 101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs)

Shelby Nelson, a law enforcement officer with the Clarksville Police Department; Staff Sgt. Mathew Lange, a military police officer with the 194th Military Police Company, 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Airborne Division Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault); Sgt. John Michl, with the 551st MP Co., 716th MP Bn.; and Jesse Hedrick, a deputy with the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, conduct the breaching phase of the approaches and breaching portion of the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Reaction Training train-the-trainer active-shooter course Oct. 14, 2015, at Fort Campbell, KY. (Spc. Joseph Green, 101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs)

A five-day course, the ALERRT train the trainer active-shooter course provides law enforcement officers with new tactics and new methods in a joint training environment in order to respond to an active-shooter situation while working together with local, state and military law enforcement agencies.

“The ALERRT course is a dynamic course in which we teach [law enforcement] officers and military [law enforcement] officers to respond to an active shooter situation, deal with the problem, reduce the problem and save as many lives as possible,” said Armando Ramirez, an adjunct instructor for the ALERRT at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, program.

The personnel who successfully complete the training become certified instructors of the ALERRT course.

Officer Shelby Nelson with the Clarksville Police Department, provides cover for Sgt. John Michl, a military police officer with the 551st Military Police Company, 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Airborne Division Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), from behind a Montgomery County Sheriff's Office vehicle during the approaches and breaching portion of the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Reaction Training train-the-trainer active shooter course Oct. 14, 2015, at Fort Campbell, KY. (Spc. Joseph Green, 101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs)

Officer Shelby Nelson with the Clarksville Police Department, provides cover for Sgt. John Michl, a military police officer with the 551st Military Police Company, 716th Military Police Battalion, 101st Airborne Division Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), from behind a Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office vehicle during the approaches and breaching portion of the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Reaction Training train-the-trainer active shooter course Oct. 14, 2015, at Fort Campbell, KY. (Spc. Joseph Green, 101st Sustainment Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (AA) Public Affairs)

“The goal of this instructor-level class is for the [law enforcement] officers to have the confidence necessary and the tools necessary to teach an active-shooter curriculum to their [law enforcement] officers from whatever jurisdiction they come from,” said Ramirez. “A standardized program is what we are hoping to achieve with both the civilian [law enforcement] officers and military [law enforcement] officers working together.”

The joint training environment of the ALERRT course provides military, local and state law enforcement officers a great opportunity to work and train together.

“This [training] opportunity is an awesome one from the ability that we are not only taking into account our military police battalion and our director of emergency services, we’ve got the division provost marshal’s office involved, and we’ve got local and state partners. So we’ve got a great interagency collaborate approach to prevent this scenario from happening in the future,” said Lt. Col. Michael Johnston, the commander of the 716th MP Bn., 101st Abn. Div. Sust. Bde.

A collaborate effort, the ALERRT course requires many agencies to work together to accomplish the mission and make it a success.

“The joint partnership between the FBI, civilian law enforcement, military, the funding from the FBI, and the [instructors from the] ALERRT at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, all working together for one common goal – that’s what we like to see,” said Ramirez. “It’s a community thing, and the more people we get to respond to a critical incident like an active-shooter, the better.”


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