Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Culture

Dodging the Roadkill: My Harley-Davidson Ultra-Limited

 

Dodging the Roadkill - A Biker's JourneyClarksville, TN – I’ve been riding since January 2016.  My first bike was a 2016 Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special.  

I LOVED that bike.  I put 32,000 miles on it.  

I took it to Texas, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky and all throughout Tennessee.  I had a Stage 1 kit on it and kept it serviced.  It was a magnificent bike.

In 2017, with all the traveling I do, I traded for the 2017 Ultra-Limited.  It offered the new Milwaukee Eight engine, had more storage, heated grips and updated technology.  I’ve put 24,000 miles on it so far.  

Hank at Cumberland Furnace Railroad Depot

Hank at Cumberland Furnace Railroad Depot

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You should never Judge a Person by Appearances Only

 

facesClarksville, TN – Our culture has become fixated on what a person appears to be. Hundreds of books have been written on the subject; numerous television shows now describe this; scores of people now make their living by telling people what to wear. We believe that youth is the crowning age of life and everyone must work daily to present a youthful, attractive appearance.

Both women and men are advised on how to succeed in their professions by wearing certain types of clothing, using the latest age-defying make-up, choosing the right hair style, buying that certain briefcase that shows you to be executive material, and having every blemish—from body language to teeth—corrected to fit the ideal presentation. «Read the rest of this article»

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Indian Community gathers to celebrate their freedom

 
Pravin Mehta (white shirt) leads the singing of the Indian National Anthem in McGregor Park.

Pravin Mehta (white shirt) leads the singing of the Indian National Anthem in McGregor Park.

In what is a celebration of the myriad of distinct cultures represented in Clarksville, The Indian community gathered in McGregor Park under the Indian flag in the International Avenue of Flags, on Sunday August 15th 2010 to celebrate the Indian Independence Day. On August 15th 1947 India was granted its freedom from British rule, and on January 26th 1950 it became a Republic.

Kishore Shah and Pravin Mehta, organized the ceremony in which community members sang the Indian National Anthem; followed by the the Star Spangled Banner; they closed with the Vande Mataram, the Indian National Song. Afterwards they gathered under the park’s pavilion for a pot luck dinner featuring home cooked Indian cuisine. «Read the rest of this article»

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Visual Artist Linder to Give Lecture at APSU tonight

 

Austin Peay State University LogoJoan Linder’s tools seem almost archaic. When the New York-based visual artist sits down to draw her large-scale images, she takes a quill pen and dips it in a bottle of ink.

While her contemporaries draft and create via computer, she patiently lets her pen guide each stroke in the formation of a work.

“The sleight or sloppiness of hand creates an awkward and intimate surface, which is compounded by the definitive and energized process of cross hatching,” she said in an artist’s statement. «Read the rest of this article»

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A somber rememberence of September 11th, kicks off the 22nd annual Riverfest

 

riverfest2009On a glorious September afternoon the 22nd annual Riverfest began. The weather simply could not have been better.

The annual Riverfest Festival recognizes the role  the two rivers passing through the heart of our town have played in the heritage of our city. At its heart the City of Clarksville will always be a river town, our lives affected by their timeless ebb and flow. One of the greatest things about Riverfest is how it draws us together, all walks of life intermingling,  and for a that moment at least we are one people.

The final day of Riverfest will be jammed packed with things to see and do, so come early, and bring the whole family to join in this amazing celebration of our culture and heritage!

Riverfest Friday evening

Riverfest Friday evening

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Never judge a person by appearances

 

facesOur culture has become fixated on what a person appears to be. Hundreds of books have been written on the subject; numerous television shows now describe this; scores of people now make their living by telling people what to wear. We believe that youth is the crowning age of life and everyone must work daily to present a youthful, attractive appearance.

Both women and men are advised on how to succeed in their professions by wearing certain types of clothing, using the latest age-defying make-up, choosing the right hair style, buying that certain briefcase that shows you to be executive material, and having every blemish—from body language to teeth—corrected to fit the ideal presentation.

Over the years I’ve learned of some rather interesting misconceptions formed by judging people on their appearances. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Commentary | No Comments
 

“Meet the Photographer” Event

 

The Customs House MuseumOn Friday, April 24th, David Farmerie will be holding a lecture and discussion in the museum auditorium at 7 pm. This event, sponsored in part by the Arts and Heritage Development Council, is free to the public. The subject of David’s talk will be his Seven Deadly Sins series. Farmerie says,” When I was asked to create this series I was virtually unaware of the Seven Deadly Sins other than a vague recollection from my youth while attending Catholic school. After researching, I was amazed at what I discovered. They were not the oppressive doctrine that I was expecting. In fact, they seemed to have a profound place in our society today…and that was the beginning of the conceptualization”. «Read the rest of this article»

 


The Snowman: Perennial enchantment

 

the-snowman-dvd.JPG

This review ran in Clarksville Online on Nov. 29, 2006. But as my granddaughter and I unpacked my collection of snowmen for the coming holiday, my carefully wrapped musical plush Snowman emerged, to the delight of both of us. Everything else was dropped as we sat in the living room, puling the cord that triggered a music box version of the film’s hit song: Walking in the Air. As a Christmas gift idea for the child all of us, and a reminder of just how good animation can be, I reprint this review, with an updated video clip. Enjoy.

I can’t recall how many copies of The Snowman I’ve bought over the years, but it’s been quite a few. I usually end up giving them away to children who watch and are captivated by its’ magic. And then I buy another copy.

To the uninitiated, The Snowman is a delightful, animated short film about a young boy, James, who builds a snowman that springs to life as midnight chimes. It has only a few lines of introduction at the beginning; the remainder of the film is a symphonic soundtrack that follows their adventures, first as Snowman explores James’ world, putting on pants with suspenders, trying on hats, discovering a music box and the dangerous warmth of a fire. James and his fantasy creation dance across the floor of the house before heading outside, where the he and Snowman, in his mossy green hat and scarf embark on a journey north, racing through the forest and flying through the sky to a magical gathering of snowpeople in the far, far north.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7uyVHBPqvU

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Trail of Tears Commemorative Day to kick off 11th Annual Inter-Tribal PowWow

 

The Trail of Tears Commemorative Day will lead off the Native Cultural Circle’s annual Inter-Tribal PowWow. The Port Royal site is the only remaining uncovered segment of the original trail in Tennessee.

October 11 and 12th. Mark your calendars. The second weekend of October is just around the corner. That means the Native Cultural Circle’s Inter-Tribal PowWow is here. Every year the group hosts the annual two-day powwow as a means of educating the general public about Tennessee’s native peoples traditions, culture and customs.

Clarksville is blessed, in that the powwow site has truly historic significance, because it is staged adjacent to last remaining uncovered segment of the Trail of Tears in Tennessee. The land is included in the Port Royal State Historic Park, where the quiet beauty of the area is well suited to the occasion. «Read the rest of this article»

 

Trail of Tears Pow Wow drums connect heart and feet to Mother Earth

 

On September 6th and 7th the annual Trail of Tears Pow Wow took place in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.  This Pow Wow is on the same weekend as the Clarksville Riverfest (that’s how I remember when it is).  I went there on Sunday afternoon (9.7.08) and saw several types of competition dancing for different ages and styles.  The hot day got hotter watching the young men give it their all in their competition run off.

For the run-off they did the chicken dance.  One might think that would look funny, like the white man’s version, but it was wildly fantastic leaving the audience roaring with applause.  One could see from the dancers’ movements that a chicken, like other animals who live on this planet with us, has it’s own “dance” that we can either laugh at and feel superior to, or study and learn from with respect to that animal.  It’s a choice that my culture usually doesn’t consider.

While the drummers, singers and dancers took a break, I bought an Indian fry bread, taco style, and while eating listened to the storyteller speak and play his flute.  Then I roamed around the booths surrounding the dance arena.  I moved through the crowds of people, checking out dream catchers, jewelry, leather goods, pottery, finger puppets, flutes, CD’s, tee shirts, sage, books, toys and tea. «Read the rest of this article»

 



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